Raccoon Time on the Homestead

Summertime on the Homestead is a time of activity, especially in June. The sun rises early and all the birds start shouting with glee.

“Let us out!”, shout the chickens, pecking at the coop door outside.

“Hey! This is my food!”, shout the doves at each other, in the room next door.

“Get up!”, calls old Glory the Cat, “It’s time to feed me!”

The younger cats snooze until I pull myself out of bed. We were up late and we are tired.

I start the coffee, feed Glory and stumble outside to let the chickens out. I count them while they scatter. Eight, the same number I counted at Chicken Bedtime the night before. I sigh with relief.

Patience the Cat and I look around. The garden fence is disturbed, the catch bucket at the faucet is overturned and we find a dropping.

We know who is responsible.

The night before, we had heard rattling and scratching noises. I had gotten out of bed and opened a window to find a mama raccoon and five kits, still about a third her size. She led them around the yard, digging and thrusting her nose into the straw to find food while the kits tried to figure out how to get over the garden fence. One by one, they learned to climb the fencing and joined her.

Like anybody who keeps chickens, I get nervous when raccoons hang out in my yard. A raccoon will kill the whole flock and only eat one. Coops have to be reinforced against them and I have a strong bias against their presence. In fact, Georgia Chicken got stolen by a raccoon last year. It’s a “natural death for a chicken”, as one friend consoled, but I’m still angry and don’t like to see them in the yard. I keep a saucepan full of rocks near the window and shake it to scare them away whenever I see one.

I didn’t shake the saucepan this time, though. Since they showed no interest in the chicken coop, I shut the window and went back to bed.

We were awakened later by squealing, squeaking and security lights. The young cats and I all looked at the window and then at each other. I opened the window again.

The raccoons must have found enough to eat because they were playing! The mama raccoon was tussling with the babies. She would chase them and nuzzle them with her nose while they wriggled and squealed. She jumped up on a tree and jumped down again and ran around while they chased her. Sometimes she would play with one kit while the others gamboled around together, like kittens.

I was stunned.

When I think of raccoons, I think of hardware cloth, cement blocks and double-locked coop doors. I didn’t know they could play. I didn’t know their mothers took pleasure in raising them.

In a few weeks, those kits will be grown up. They’ll be a danger to my chickens and I’ll do my best to lock up the food, empty the water bucket and scare them away.

But just for right now, I’ll watch this little miracle in disbelief and smile when I am woken up by joyful squealing.

***

©Hungry Chicken Homestead 2016

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WWII Era Chocolate Cake

Let me start by explaining that, for once, we did not make this recipe up. We adapted it from a recipe on the ever-helpful King Arthur Flour Company recipe site.

imageNot only do they have the original recipe, made vegan due to shortages of milk & eggs, but they also have a helpful explanation of how to adapt recipes for high altitude.

I don’t know exactly why we decided to make a chocolate cake, but I do know that members of the household have forbidden me from ever making it again.

Why? Is it too dry? Does it taste weird?

Actually, it’s too good. We just can’t stop eating it and nobody needs to eat half a chocolate cake in one sitting!

I adapted the recipe for what was in my kitchen and to work at 6,000 ft. My goal was a nice smooth cake with no collapsed section in the middle.

image

I accomplished the goal with a few tricks:

  • I used 3/4 of the leavener called for (baking soda)
  • I used extra water & less sugar
  • I turned up the heat by 25 degrees and shortened the cook time

Why does this help? Because our baking problems at altitude are caused by the thin air. Really! It sounds crazy, but it’s true. The air isn’t as heavy as it is at sea level and baked goods rise too fast. Quick breads and cakes tend to rise larger than the structure can support and they collapse like a soap bubble blown by an enthusiastic kid.

Reducing the leavener decreases the rising power. Using extra water thins the batter and reduces the rising potential. The sugar, interestingly enough, tends to weaken the cake structure and turning up the heat causes the batter to set more quickly, giving it less time to over-rise.

That’s the science behind the smooth cake top, in a nutshell. Now, let’s get to my version of the recipe.

Ingredients:

Cake:

1 1/2 cups all purpose flour
3/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup cocoa
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon espresso powder
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3/4 teaspoon vinegar
1/3 cup coconut oil
1 1/8 cup water

Frosting:

1 1/2 cups vegan chocolate chips
1/3 cup cold coffee

1. Preheat the oven to 375˚F. Lightly grease an 8″ square or 9″ round pan that’s at least 2 inches deep. I used an oval shaped casserole pan because I’ve used all the metal pans to water the chickens.

2. Mix all the dry ingredients into a bowl. Use your favorite method to mix in the liquids. I like to make a well in the center and add the liquids before stirring & transferring to the baking pan, but the original recipe has an interesting method for mixing right in the pan.

3. Bake the cake for 25 or 30 minutes. It’s done when a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.

4. Make the frosting by melting the chocolate chips with the coffee on the stove or in the microwave. I had twice as much frosting as I needed with this recipe, but you might like a thicker frosting layer. Try very hard not to dip a fork in the frosting to taste it. I ate about an eighth of a cup this way.

5. Let the cake cool a bit, frost and serve.

Yum!

Yum!

***

©Hungry Chicken Homestead 2015

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Hungry Chicken Homestead Project: Four Things to do with Animal Fat

“Fat” has become a dirty word, hasn’t it?  We don’t want to be fat, we fear fat will clog our arteries and nobody ever uses the phrase, “fat of the land” in a good way anymore.

Alright, maybe I'll be reviled for even bringing it up, but I'm going to talk about it anyway... while eating this cheese.

Alright, maybe I’ll be reviled for even bringing it up, but I’m going to talk about it anyway… while eating this cheese.

Personally, I’m a big fan of fat.  My interest in it began when I discovered that eating fat made me less hungry and if I wasn’t hungry all the time then I could do more stuff without stopping to eat…again.

And then I discovered that many fats could be acquired for free!

And then I discovered that many fats could be acquired for free!

It’s not that I wouldn’t be willing to pay for my fat.  It’s just that I hate to waste anything that comes from the slaughtering of an animal, which explains why I always have bags of chicken feet in the freezer.  Since fat has become so unpopular, ranchers will often give it to you, just for asking!

The fat in the picture above had been cut into squares and put into the crockpot for rendering.  I wrote about this process the first time I did it and I recommend learning it.

What can you do with it?  Here are a few ideas:

1.  You can cook with properly rendered fat.  I admit that I did once make a squash casserole with lard, which was very popular here on the Homestead.  “It tastes like it has a lot of butter!”, they said, which it did, but instead of expensive organic butter I had used free organic lard.

Most of the time, I use the lard for frying.  It has a smoke point of close to 390ºF.  That means you can get it hot enough to fry without burning the fat and setting off your smoke alarm.  Most vegetable oils have much lower smoke points unless they are heavily processed and refined.

2.  Animal fats are great for protecting your cast iron.  Cast iron can rust, but you can coat it with fat to prevent this.

Look how shiny and smooth it is!

Look how shiny and smooth it is!

3.  Why don’t people use soaps made from animal fats?  I really don’t know.  Lard and tallow make hard soaps that don’t melt in the soap dish.  Add the right combination of oils to it and the soap can be moisturizing, bubbly and whatever you want!  And no, it doesn’t smell like meat.

Diana Ford of Li'l Bit Farm makes soap for me.  She made these from my last batch of rendered lard.

Diana Ford of Li’l Bit Farm makes soap for me. She made these from my last batch of rendered lard.  The one on the left smells like chocolate!

4.  I just learned that you can make homemade skin balm from animal fat!  This does smell like meat, but you can add a combination of essential oils to make it smell like citrus and spices instead.  I love a tallow & olive oil balm, especially in the winter when daring to shave my legs before bed seems like itchy folly.

I'm almost out.  I'm going to have to beg Corner Post Meats for more tallow.

I’m almost out. I’m going to have to beg Corner Post Meats for more tallow.

Speaking of Corner Post Meats, join us for a fat rendering and balm class on Saturday, January 24, 2015!

***

©Hungry Chicken Homestead 2015

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Happy New Year from Hungry Chicken Homestead

Well … here we are at another January 1st. Does anyone else find this shocking?

Colorado Springs Local Farm Hungry Chicken Homestead Little Red 5

Little Red Hen finds it perplexing, but that’s because she’s only about a year old.

We don’t really make New Year’s resolutions here on the Homestead.  After all, most of us are chickens.  And we could review the year, but that would mean talking about losing five chickens since December 2013.  We’d rather talk about the future.

The future always contains seeds of something bigger, maybe plants and maybe dinner.

The future always contains seeds of something bigger, maybe new plants and maybe dinner.

I like to think about what worked last year, what didn’t work, what we want more of and what we want less of.  Then we make a loose plan.  I say “loose” because everybody here; cats, dogs, people and chickens, are a little opportunistic.  Maybe we planned on eating nothing but feed that day, but then a nice, delicious worm pokes its head out of the ground.  We don’t like to miss an opportunity.

These potatoes that grew in the garden despite being attacked by chickens are a prime example.

These potatoes that grew in the garden despite being attacked by chickens are a prime example.

Anyway, here is what we want more of next year:

  • Blog posts & the newsletter:  These got neglected in 2014 in favor of more businesslike pursuits, but I think it would be better to write more of them.  They help local businesses get known, they help readers know where to shop locally and I like writing them more than I like some of the other things I did in 2014.
  • Food Preservation Classes:  Did you know people consistently ask me when my next classes are?  I love teaching them and besides getting to meet interesting people, I also get to teach people how to preserve the bounty from our local farms.  I’m going to try to offer classes year round.
  • Local Business Advertising:  I’ve done some limited paid promotion of Colorado Springs Local Business blog posts on Facebook and it’s helped people find out about these great businesses we have in town like PeakMed and C2 Alpacas.  It doesn’t cost much and connects local businesses & farms with people in town who want to know about them.  (So .. If your business is headquartered in Colorado and has a presence in the Springs, contact me if you’d like to talk about affordably getting your message out to Colorado Springs shoppers.)
  • Agritourism: The most amazing thing that happened last year was that the Colorado Tourism Office (CTO) contacted me and asked if I wanted to be part of a program to help farms and ranches develop programs for tourists, like overnight stays and farm classes.  You bet I did!!  I signed up and they gave me a project to help C2 Alpacas develop their visitor programs.  I can’t believe how much fun that was!  I got to use all my interview and analytical skills AND I got to pet alpacas!  I want to do more of that this year.

(So, listen … if you have a farm or ranch and have started developing some sort of program for visitors, contact me.  I can help you get signed up with the CTO and they will pay for you to have an expert help you develop the program.  That expert may or may not be me, depending on what you need, but I’m happy to help regardless.  Your program helps our local economy and keeps our agricultural sector in business!)

And there we are.  That’s my loose plan for 2015.

Whatever your plan is, here is a New Year’s wish from the Homestead:  May your new year be full of opportunities, community and sweet-natured hens who lay lots of eggs.

Colorado Springs Local Farms Hungry Chicken Homestead Free Range Hens 5

Losing Chickens

We are down to five hens.  We started the summer with nine, but now we only have five.  While I’m finding this quite distressing, it’s interesting to note that the chickens are behaving with exactly the same exuberance they have every day.

We've lost Marshmallow, Redhead, Pumpkin and Specklehead since July.

We’ve lost Marshmallow, Redhead, Pumpkin and Specklehead since July.

You’re probably wondering what happened.  Did they get attacked by those pesky raccoons who have been breaking into the feed buckets?  Did someone finally steal them?

No.  They just died.  One by one, even with the help of the veterinarian, they died on their own.

Marshmallow laid an egg one day and expired.  I found her and the egg in the nest box.  Redhead’s comb turned purple and then I found her one morning by the garden fence.  Pumpkin got some sort of mass in her belly that compressed her digestion.  And yesterday, Specklehead … well, Specklehead hadn’t been eating.  Her comb was pale and she was lethargic.  I gave her some egg to eat, hoping to get some protein into her, and, just like that, she died.

It was quite upsetting.  I’m still pretty shaken up.

I think I understand now why some people don’t want to feel anything about chickens.  They want them to be “just chickens”, entities without feelings or personalities.  As anyone who has ever met a live chicken knows, these things are not true, but if they were then we wouldn’t have to mourn the loss of each hilarious, exuberant bird.

It’s too late for me, though.  I already know the truth and it disturbs me that these little bird-friends whom I talked to and played with and cared for are gone.  In general, these silly animals who try to eat my hat and steal grapes out of my hands live for a powerful flash and then fade out of existence, like lightning on a seemingly clear night.  I know they don’t live long and I don’t want to fear their demise.  I want to understand that the difference between life and death is ultimately out of my hands, that my responsibility is to treat them well and let them be birds, but if a person is to permit her own feelings then every death is going to sting, whether she accepts it as part of life or not.

I miss them and marvel at how the other birds just go on being birds.  They might rearrange where they sleep, but they aren’t any more or less nice to each other today than they were yesterday.  They still stand around preening and come running when I open the door, even though just yesterday they watched Specklehead’s death throes with me.  I see no evidence that they now fear the future or feel that anything is different today at all.

They don’t, but I do.  Sometimes a big brain is no blessing.

Megalomaniac Vegetables

What’s the date now?  Oh, yes.  It’s October 14.  I got lost in the calendar for a while there.

We’ve been so busy on the Homestead since mid-August that it may seem we’ve disappeared from view.  But here we are.

Like Buttercup Chicken in the straw...

Disappeared, like Buttercup Chicken in the straw…

Why did we disappear?  Let me show you a picture.

We were completely overwhelmed by food.

We were completely overwhelmed by food.

You may recall that in August I wrote about the Most Important Reason to Eat Your Vegetables, which is because of their megalomaniacal tendencies.  We did our best, but the vegetables took over and we’ve spent the last eight weeks trying to roust them out of the house and into their jars.

Chard is a challenge.  It's a perennial, coming back year after year, unbidden and without mercy.

Chard is a challenge. It’s a perennial, coming back year after year, unbidden and without mercy.

We canned at least a hundred pounds of tomatoes.  We made pickles and dried apple chips.  We ate all the grapes we could stomach.

The chickens were helpful in that last activity.

The chickens were helpful in that last activity.

The season is starting to wane and we may soon be able to reclaim the house and return to our normal activities.  The garage is no longer infested with apples and the tomatoes have vacated the living room.  I’m glad because I interviewed several interesting business owners before the onslaught, such as Chris of Pitstik, a miraculous locally-made deodorant and Susi who manages the dog wash Doggi Pawz.  I have good stories to tell.

But first …

But first, a nap.

But first, a nap.

See you soon.  And keep an eye on those vegetables.  You never know what they might be plotting.

The single most important reason you should eat your vegetables

According to my calendar I am not working today, which means this post is purely for fun.  I’d like to start it with this classic headline:

“Do you want a diet that works?”

Let me explain that I don’t really know much about diets.  I’ve loosely followed the Paleo diet for years, but I’m not strict about it because it would ban my goat milk share and the sweet corn that comes yearly in the CSA box.

I worked hard to get this milk share and if paleolithic people couldn't get goats to share ... well, that's just not my problem.

I worked hard to get this milk share and if paleolithic people couldn’t get goats to share … well, that’s just not my problem.

I have noticed, however, that most diets encourage eating vegetables.  And that’s good because in the summertime, vegetables threaten to TAKE OVER THE WORLD!

If there is one thing I have in the summer, it's vegetables!

This pile of vegetation was only part of my AVOG CSA share this week.  It’s outrageous how vegetables just come right in and make themselves at home.

Especially zucchini.  We all know about the megalomaniacal zucchini.

Especially zucchini. We all know about the megalomaniacal tendencies of zucchini.

We really only have one weapon against zucchini and its colleagues.  Eating.  Every summer, the chickens and I feel the awesome responsibility of our role in saving the world from vegetable domination and we work hard to render their threat harmless by consuming as many of these vegetables as an animal can.

I feel that a good recipe helps.  The chickens, on the other hand, don't care one way or another.

I feel that a good recipe helps. The chickens, on the other hand, don’t care one way or another.

The result?  We are full of vegetables all the time.  Our crops bulge with them.  Our stomachs work overtime processing all that soluble fiber and vitamins.  Our skin glows, our feathers become glossy and some of us produce beet pink fertilizer.  Even our hair plumps up and shines.

We become svelte and beautiful, which can only mean we are winning the battle.

We become svelte and beautiful, which can only mean we are winning the battle.

If you’re in the same zucchini boat, I’d like to offer a battle strategy:

1.  Every week, write up a list of vegetables in the house and post it where everyone can see it.  This helps remind everyone that the battle is still raging.

Cross them off as you conquer each one.

Cross them off as you conquer each one.

2.  Visit the Flying Carrot at the Colorado Farm and Art Market for recipes to sharpen your eating.  Or visit the Martha Stewart Seasonal Eating pages for tons of recipes for seasonal produce (including zucchini).

I collect the Flying Carrot recipes like baseball cards.

I collect the Flying Carrot recipes like baseball cards for grownups.

3.  Invest in a “Spiralizer“.  This little non-electric machine cuts vegetables into “noodles”, chips and other shapes quickly and without a lot of noise.  I love this thing.  You can make zucchini “noodles”, stuff them in a bag for freezing and then rinse off the machine in half an hour.  Freeze the noodles and you can put off conquering that bit of zucchini for another day, thus conserving your energy.

I’m sure you have other tips for maintaining your sovereignty in your own home when vegetables threaten to take over.  Tell us about them in the comments!

***

© 2014 Hungry Chicken Homestead

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How Colorado Agri-Feed saved me from flies with Straw

I called Colorado Agri-Feed on the phone and the conversation went like this.

Me:  “Do you carry straw?”

Friendly Man on the Phone (FMP): “Yes, we have plenty in stock.”

Me, awkwardly, since I figure no one has ever asked this before:  “Do you, by chance, deliver?”

FMP: “We do!  There is a 20 bale minimum, though, and the delivery fee is $60.”

Long pause while I think about how chicken droppings attract flies and how much I hate handling full fly traps.

Me: “I’ll take it!”

Colorado Springs Local Business Colorado Agri-Feed Straw Truck

They delivered the straw the next day. I saw this truck and thought, “Omigosh! Is all that for me??”. It wasn’t.  It turns out other people order straw for delivery too.

I have been struggling with the straw problem for a long time.  I drive a subcompact car and if I work very hard, I can fit two bales of straw in it.  Bringing the straw home is followed by cleaning straw out of the car.  It’s never enough straw either.  I wanted to spread it over the entire yard because the chickens kick it around and cover their own droppings, thus minimizing opportunities for flies to get involved.

Do I need to mention that I hate flies?

The straw is also useful in the garden where I use it as mulch.  The only place I don’t like to use it is in the coop because it doesn’t dry as readily in there and gets to smelling bad.  It’s perfect outside, though, in our uncommonly dry climate.

Colorado Springs Local Business Colorado Agri-Feed Chickens waiting for straw

It also happens that chickens love straw! I consider it a chicken toy. Here they are watching the truck with anticipation.

The nice thing about having it delivered, besides not having to clean out the car, was that the delivery men unloaded it for me. One man tossed the bales over the fence and the other stacked up my 20 bales with the use of bale hooks.  The hooks look like what you’d expect on Captain Hook from Peter Pan, except he had two and he had hands to hold them with.

The obvious conclusion here is that had the crocodile merely eaten Captain Hook’s left hand at the end of the story (instead of eating the entire pirate), he could have had a satisfying second career stacking straw bales.

Colorado Springs Local Business Colorado Agri-Feed Chickens anticipating straw

The chickens couldn’t wait to get their little beaks into the bales.

I put a few bales around the yard and stood back with my camera.

Colorado Springs Local Business Colorado Agri-Feed Chickens Backyard Chickens Enjoying Straw

Chickens do a great job of spreading out straw! Best landscape contractors you’ll ever have!

The chickens like the straw because it has seeds in it.  They’ll scratch and peck all day long to eat the seeds.  It keeps them occupied, discourages flies and I think it looks nicer than the bare dirt on the ground.

It looks like a barnyard.  And that makes this homesteader very happy.

***

© 2014 Hungry Chicken Homestead

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Planting Plum Trees

If you ask me, this is a story about how I planted a plum tree in my backyard.

If you ask Buttercup Chicken, it's a completely different kind of story.

If you ask Buttercup Chicken, it’s a completely different kind of story.

I have been wanting to plant a couple of fruit trees in my backyard for quite a while, but it’s always been too expensive.  This week, I got my chance!

Sara Foster owns a local business called I Dig the Garden and she had too many bare root plum trees!

Sara Foster owns a local business called I Dig the Garden and she had too many bare root plum trees for a project.  Guess what she did!  She sold a couple to me!

Sara dropped off the trees on Thursday.  Since I didn’t have time to plant them until Monday, I put them in a bucket of water to keep the roots from drying out.

That's where Buttercup chicken encountered them.  From her perspective, she finally had her own water bowl.

That’s where Buttercup Chicken encountered them. From her perspective, she finally had her own water bowl.

I’ve never planted trees before.  Sara said to dig a hole about an inch deeper than the length of the roots, mix in some compost and then put the dirt back in over the roots.  The dirt shouldn’t cover any higher than the roots and it’s good to have the tree in a little depression so water will sink towards it.

I did all these things with one tree on Monday.  It seems to be working so far.

Buttercup, on the other hand, ran into a problem.

Buttercup, on the other hand, ran into a problem.

I had to stake the tree to hold it up.  A forward thinking person would have put the stake in the ground before planting the tree, but I forgot to do that.  Luckily, the roots were all facing one direction and I could put the stake in without disturbing them.

It's not really a stake.  It's more like a hat rack.  I found it in the backyard when I moved in and made it useful.

It’s not really a stake. It’s more like a hat rack. I found it in the backyard when I moved in and made it useful.

Unfortunately, I only had time to plant one tree yesterday.  The other is still waiting for me in the bucket.

Buttercup is not too thrilled about sharing her bucket.

It’s been there long enough now that it’s starting to attract attention.

The trees will need about three years to produce fruit, but you know what they say.  The best time to plant a tree was several years ago.  The next best time is today.

Colorado Springs Local Business Chicken and Tree 5

***

© 2014 Hungry Chicken Homestead

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Drip Irrigation in the garden

My furrows did not work.  And it wasn’t even the chickens’ fault.

Colorado Springs Backyard Chickens Looking Guilty

They look guilty anyway, don’t they?

Both Brian Keenan of Purple Mountain Hydroponics and Nathan Giffin of Rhino Office Supply warned me that they wouldn’t work.  Brian explained that my neighborhood is built on lots of extra rock that had been dumped here after one of the big floods in the 20th century.  Nathan told me he’d tried it and the water just drained right out of the furrows, into the ground.

And that’s exactly what happened here!  I couldn’t get enough water into the furrows to water all the plants.  It all drained out before the last plants got water.

Colorado Springs Local Business Home Drip System

Thus begins the tale of the drip system.

I went to Good Earth Garden Center for advice, as I always do, and they sent me to ABC Plumbing on Fillmore St.  ABC has just about every plumbing item in the world and I was completely lost.

Luckily, ABC has an employee they call the “designer” who designs drip systems for people.  This young man spent about an hour with me while I drew a picture of my garden and explained what I wanted to do.

Colorado Springs Local Business Home Drip System Pressure Regulator

In the end, he made it very simple.

The drip system starts with a pressure regulator, the big black cylinder in the pictures.  The young man said I didn’t need a filter since it was running off city water, but I bought one anyway.

Colorado Springs Local Business Home Drip System Soaker Hoses

My soaker hoses tended to clog up. I don’t know if the filter will help, but it was just a couple dollars and worth a try.

I also needed water “line”, which is the black and blue tube that carries the water to the drip lines and, naturally, I would need the drip lines themselves.

Colorado Springs Local Business Home Drip System in action

The drip lines are narrow tubes with little holes every eight inches. The water drips from the holes to the plant.

I got really excited that I could put the lines wherever I wanted them instead of having to build the garden around the irrigation lines like I do with soaker hoses.  I only had to buy one tool, a $2 punch tool that makes the holes in the water line.  Then I attached the drip lines with little plastic pieces.

Colorado Springs Local Business Home Drip System Connection

Larry Stebbins of Pikes Peak Urban Gardens recommends planting in little depressions to collect water near the plants.   I had ready-made depressions now, so I put the drip lines right into the furrows.

I only had one problem, which was not knowing how little water the system uses.  I tested it by turning up the water as high as I did for the soaker hoses or a sprinkler.

Colorado Springs Local Business Home Drip System End Cap

All the little end-caps on the drip lines popped off!

It took me a couple days to figure out I had overwhelmed the pressure regulator and the water was pushing the caps off.  I barely have to turn the water on to make this work.  I run it for about an hour at a time and it just trickles its way to the plants.

Now all I need is a timer to remind me to turn OFF the water and I’ll be all set!

***

© 2013 Hungry Chicken Homestead

Want to read about locally owned businesses in Colorado Springs? The chickens want to tell you about them! Join them in supporting our local economy by signing up for our twice-monthly newsletter!