Colorado Springs Local Business: Romick Studios … Candy!

Call me crazy, but I figure a post about a candy business probably doesn’t need a lot of text. A picture is worth a thousand words, as they say.

For example, here is an articulate picture of chocolate covered rice crispie treats.

For example, here is an articulate picture of chocolate covered rice crispy treats.

I met with Kate and Josiah Gillette, a local couple who are living an interesting life.  Kate makes the candy and Josiah markets it.

“Why do you call your business Romick Studios?”, I asked.  It’s kind of an odd name for a candy shop.

“Well,” explained Josiah, “We do a lot of different things.”

It’s true!  They’ve both worked with the Renaissance Fair, in candy shops, selling roses and at other glamorous types of jobs.  These days, Kate works as a veterinary technician, a heroic occupation in the opinion of all the members of this Homestead.

Being a veterinary tech can be stressful and Kate says she started making candy as a way to relax.  It works!  I felt very relaxed eating one of these chocolate covered pretzels.

Being a veterinary tech can be stressful and Kate says she started making candy as a way to relax. It works! I felt very relaxed eating one of these chocolate covered pretzels.

I learned about their business when they applied to sell it at the Colorado Farm and Art Market.  The Market is selective about what is allowed to be sold and a jury has to taste all the food to make sure it’s up to Market standards.

It just so happened that in the month of January I was the sole member of the food jury.

That means that I have personally tasted every variety of Kate's candy you can buy at the Farm and Art Market.  I should come down from the sugar high any minute.

That means that I have personally tasted every variety of Kate’s candy you can buy at the Farm and Art Market.  I did this all in one sitting and then was up half the night running around.

Do I have a favorite?  Why yes, yes I do.

In my opinion, you can't get a better candy than one with dark chocolate and nuts, like this pecan truffle.

In my opinion, you can’t get a better candy than one with dark chocolate and nuts, like this pecan truffle.

But my favorite doesn’t have to be your favorite.

You'll have plenty of varieties to choose from.

You’ll have plenty of varieties to choose from.

As luck would have it, I didn’t have to eat all this candy myself.  We met at the Wild Goose Meeting House and co-owner Russ Ware happened to be in the shop.  I did what I do best and introduced him to Josiah and Kate.  Naturally, they left samples for him too.

I liked the peanut butter cups a lot too.

Hopefully, that means you’ll find their candy at the Wild Goose in the future.

You can find Romick Studios at the Colorado Farm and Art Market one Saturday a month (January 31, February 21, March 28 and April 25).  They may be at the summer markets as well and before long you’ll probably find their candy in stores and restaurants too!

It tastes as good as it looks, but take my advice … pace yourselves.

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©Hungry Chicken Homestead 2015

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Colorado Springs Local Farm Education: The Flying Carrot

“What are you making tonight?”, I asked Nuwanee Kirihennedige when I arrived at the weekly Flying Carrot planning dinner.

“Tabbouleh with quinoa,” she replied.  “We aren’t allowed to use recipes, but we sort of know how to make tabbouleh.”

I suddenly felt a kinship with these young people.  I "sort of know" how to make all of my recipes.

I suddenly felt a kinship with these young people. I “sort of know” how to make all of my recipes.

The Flying Carrot is a partnership between the Pikes Peak Community Foundation and the UCCS Sports Nutrition graduate program.  As one would expect with these sponsors, it combines well-defined goals with real-life farms.  Nuwanee explained the program’s goals.

  • Environment: This one is pretty obvious.  Buying food that was grown locally is better for the environment.  You’ve heard all this about miles traveled and biodiversity before.
  • Economy:  Buying food from local farmers supports our economy, helps farmers stay on their land and creates jobs right here in town.
  • Equity: We promote justice for farmers, who get fair prices for food when we buy it directly from them (rather than through a third party like a grocery store).  We are also promoting justice for animals when we buy meat, eggs and milk from small producers who treat their animals like the living beings that they are, not lifeless commodities.
Buying local food also promotes deliciousness.

Buying local food also promotes deliciousness.

This probably all seems very academic until you realize you’ve seen the Flying Carrot’s table at farmers’ markets and events.

They cook the food right there at the event and you can try it!

They cook the food right there at the event and you can try it!  You can take home the recipe too.

Every week, the group of graduate students and their local-food-loving friends get together with their teacher Nana Meyer, and try to come up with a simple recipe using local ingredients.  As the group experimented with the vegetables they’d gotten from Colorado farms this week, Nuwanee told me funny stories about tasters’ reactions to their recipes.

“People don’t always know how good locally grown vegetables taste and they are surprised when they try our samples.  They think it’s our recipe that’s so good, but it’s not!  It’s the food we got from the farms!”

Kids are no exception to this rule.  Their parents are often surprised when they enthusiastically eat a locally grown sugar pea or bit of summer squash and ask for more.

It's not vegetables that are yucky.  It's under-ripe vegetables, grown for shipping and shelf life rather than flavor.

It’s not vegetables that are yucky. It’s prematurely picked, under-ripe vegetables that were grown for shipping and shelf life rather than flavor that are yucky.

The group will be proving Nuwanee’s point this week at the Colorado Farm and Art Market on Wednesday.  The tabbouleh recipe didn’t work.  When I left, they were experimenting with tastier ways to use the locally grown garlic, parsley, kale and (possibly) goat cheese.

What will they have at the Market?  Visit Ivywild School between 3PM and 7PM to find out how they solved the puzzle!  It may or may not be fried quinoa patties, like this one.

What will they have at the Market? Visit Ivywild School between 3PM and 7PM to find out how they solved the puzzle! It may or may not be fried quinoa patties, like this one.

I don’t know exactly what they’ll have, but I do know it will be delicious.  Our local farms have made sure of that.

Colorado Springs Local Food Education Flying Carrot Sign

 

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© 2014 Hungry Chicken Homestead

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Chickens in the Kitchen Canning Classes Summer 2014

Are you ready to learn to can your own produce?

Canning Tomatoes grown on Colorado Farms

Personally, I feel one can never have enough home-canned tomatoes.

As you may have noticed, I like to encourage people in Colorado to buy food grown here by family farms.  If you can preserve the food then you can buy as much as you want and eat local all year round!

But where does one learn to can?

If you’re in the mood to be solitary and study, you can learn from the National Center for Home Food Preservation.  This reputable and helpful online source will give you information about all sorts of food preservation techniques and links to the USDA guides on canning.

Patience the Cat loves local food, farms and businesses in Colorado Springs.

But, as Patience the Cat will tell you, canning is more fun in a group.

On Patience’s advice, I’m offering a series of hands-on water bath canning classes again this summer.  We’ll use locally grown herbs, fruits and vegetables from Colorado farms.  You might be wondering what fruit we will can in July, but I won’t know until the farmers tell me what will be available on the class date.

All four classes will be held at the Tabor Mountain Bakehouse on Saturdays at 2pm.  A nearby parking garage has $1 parking on Saturdays, which will make it easier to attend at this downtown location.

Click on the links below to sign up or click here for our Chickens in the Kitchen schedule page!

You can sign up for the whole series at once …

  • Canning Class Series:  Learn water bath canning techniques for a variety of foods in this four class series.  We’ll learn the basics in the first class in May, make our own mustard in June, preserve whole fruits in July and finally make pickles in August; all while practicing water bath canning safety.  You’ll save 10% and be sure of your space in each of these small, hands-on classes.  The cost is $117.

Or just take one or two classes.

Learn the basics of water bath canning in this introductory class!  We’ll cover canning safety, tools, jar preparation and proper storage.  Canning recipes can be complex and each type of food requires a different process, but you will have a chance to practice the basic steps in this hands-on class.

Learn to make mustard and practice your water bath canning skills.  We’ll prepare and can a lemon sage mustard in this hands-on class.  You’ll go home with a jar of mustard and the recipe!

Learn to safely can your own fruits! We’ll cover basic methods of preserving whole fruit in this hands-on class, including preserving in syrup, juice and water. We’ll discuss water bath canning safety, food preservation science and the steps to successful canning while processing a batch of local, seasonal food. Each participant will go home with information and a jar of produce.

This is a great way to make the most of our local harvest and have your favorite fruit on hand for desserts and jams all year long!

Amaze your friends by making your own pickles. We’ll make a batch of water bath canned quick pickles and start a batch of fermented pickles during this two hour workshop. Have you eaten deli pickles? Learn how they ferment in the lactic acid they make themselves! You can take this recipe home and run your own pickle experiment on the kitchen counter.

Each participant will take home a jar of quick pickles and a jar of cucumbers ready to ferment!

Plums from a Colorado Springs farm in cherry juice

We’ll cover how to can fruit in juice instead of sugar syrup in the fruit class!

Don’t delay!  Each class is limited to eight participants and we always have a lot of fun.  Sign up today and join us for all the fun!

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© 2013 Hungry Chicken Homestead

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Cooking Class: El Salvadoran Goat Dish

I have here, for your viewing enjoyment, a lovely lamb dish from Seeds Community Cafe.

"Wait," you say.  "I thought this was an article about goat dishes!"

“Wait,” you say. “I thought this was an article about goat dishes!”

Why don’t I show you a picture of a goat dish?  Because I haven’t the foggiest idea how to cook it!

Do you?

As Craig Mchugh of A Joyful Noise Farm pointed out when I last visited, Colorado’s climate is not well suited to raising cattle, but you can raise goats here with a much smaller environmental footprint.  Craig and Kellie raise meat goats for this very reason.

That got me to wondering why we eat so much beef and so little goat.  If we are truly interested in sustainable farming and living sensibly in our climate, we ought to change that.  But I learned with lamb not to experiment.

When I got to taste a goat dish made by local Chef Kevin Campbell, it was extraordinary.  If I experiment on my own … well, you can imagine for yourself.

Enter Herbert Aparicio, a.k.a. Mr. Goat Cheese Lady.  I ran into him at the grocery store and told him my problem.  Who could teach me how to cook this sustainable, locally available meat?  It turns out that besides building beautiful chicken coops, beehives and just about anything else you might desire for your homestead, Herbert can cook!  He hails from El Salvador and learned good goat recipes from his family.

Herbert generously offered to teach me and you what he knows!  We’re going to hold a class!

It will be at the Tabor Mountain Bakehouse on Pikes Peak Ave. (next to Josh & John’s from 6pm – 8pm on Tuesday, Feb. 25.  We’ll cook and then eat this gluten-free recipe.

It’s a great opportunity to learn to eat more sustainably and in a way that supports our local economy.  We only have room for eight students and we’re able to keep the cost at only $30 because Herbert is donating the meat for the class, so don’t delay!

We have so many wonderful and adventurous cooks in our community that I expect space in this unusual class to go quickly.  Click the button below or here to sign up!

© 2013 Hungry Chicken Homestead

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It’s almost time for the Community Dinner!

Did you attend the Community Dinner last year?  I did!

And so did the Bubble Fairy!

And so did the Bubble Fairy!

And now it’s almost time for the next dinner.  My, how time flies!

The sunset last year was spectacular!

The sunset last year was spectacular!

The dinner is held every year around Local Food Week.  It’s a big potluck dinner with the best food around!  Everyone makes a dish with at least one locally procured ingredient.  Keep in mind that this is a dinner attended by people who care about food, which means everything is delicious!

This year, the dinner is at Hillside Gardens on Saturday, September 15, at 5PM.

This year, they'll have an auction to raise money for Black Forest Fire Rescue.  This Le Crueset dish from Sparrowhawk Cookware is on the auction table.

This year, they’ll have an auction to raise money for Black Forest Fire Rescue. This Le Creuset dish from Sparrowhawk Cookware is on the auction table.

I’m having an interesting conversation about the auction items with one of the volunteers.

“We have gift certificates for acupuncture treatment, irrigation system tune-ups, dining at Springs Orleans and Jake and Telly’s, Il Vicino, Amanda’s Fonda, Drifters Hamburgers, Josh and Johns, and TAPAteria.  We have jam, worm castings, liver tea, baked goods and a gallon of paint.”

“Donna,” I replied, “I understand all the words in this email except for this … “liver tea”.  Is it made of livers?”

“I see how you could think that,” she wrote back, “but it’s actually a tea made by Anna’s Apothecary.  It’s good for the liver.”

Thank goodness.

This interesting-sounding business that I never heard of before will be auctioning off a guided hike.

This interesting-sounding business that I never heard of before will be auctioning off a guided hike.

Not to be obsessed with the food or anything, but Ranch Foods Direct will be bringing a chuck roast and Orchard Ovens Bakery will bring a dessert.

This will be a darn good free dinner!

Did I mention that the tickets are free?

Did I mention that the tickets are free?

You can secure free tickets to this dinner if you hurry.  Or, you can get up to four tickets with a donation.

Some members of my household are sleeping through this opportunity, but not me!

Some members of my household are sleeping through this opportunity, but not me!

Get your tickets today and then run over to Hunt or Gather to find yourself a local ingredient to work with!  (Well … maybe you should wait a few weeks to buy the ingredients.)

I’ll see you at the dinner!

***

© 2013 Hungry Chicken Homestead

Want to read about locally owned businesses in Colorado Springs? The chickens want to tell you about them! Join them in supporting our local economy by signing up for our twice-monthly newsletter!

 

Upcoming Local Foods Meetup Events

We’ve got two lunches, A Farm Volunteer Day and Goat Playtime.

"Here," says the brown goat, "I'll push and you go up.  We'll figure this slide out yet!"

“Here,” says the brown goat, “I’ll push and you go up. We’ll figure this slide out yet!”

How can you resist?

Join us for any or all of these events by signing up on the Local Foods Meetup site!

Farm Volunteer Day at Easter Egg Acres

Sunday, July 14

Easter Egg Acres has been in the way of a couple of hailstorms this summer and could use some help cleaning up.  If you haven’t been there, it’s a great opportunity to help our your local farmers and visit with their herd of goats.  They’ll give us a tour of the farm, which includes goats, chickens and guinea hens, as well as solar panels and a windmill for generating electricity.

Click here to sign up and help out these hard working farmers!

Lunch at Curbside Cuisine

Wednesday, July 24 at noon.

Looking for something fun and a break from the workday?  Join us for lunch at Curbside Cuisine and take your pick from the food trucks’ wide variety of offerings.  We’ll eat in Acacia Park across the street.

Click here to sign up!

A Tour of Our Place on the Mesa and Goat Playtime

Saturday, July 27 at noon

Did you know there are farms in Monument?  Our Place on the Mesa raises goats, sheep, rabbits and chickens just across the railroad tracks from downtown Old Monument.  If you’ve been thinking of getting a raw goat’s milk share, you won’t want to miss this.  The Nigerian Dwarf goats, the kind you may soon be allowed to keep in your own backyard in Colorado Springs, give a creamy milk that tastes like vanilla ice cream!

Click here to sign up!

Lunch at Amanda’s Fonda on Academy Blvd.

Saturday, August 10 at 1PM

Locally owned Mexican restaurant, Amanda’s Fonda, just opened a new location on Academy.  Join us for lunch to check it out!

Look how much fun these sheep are having!  Don't miss out!

Look how much fun these sheep are having! Don’t miss out!  Sign up today!

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© 2013 Hungry Chicken Homestead

Want to read about locally owned businesses in Colorado Springs? The chickens want to tell you about them! Join them in supporting our local economy by signing up for our twice-monthly newsletter!

Cookbook Giveaway: The Garden Varieties Greens Cookbook

Do you wish you could get more greens in your diet?

Do you feel like this when faced with the actual greens?

Patience is not actually burying his head in the chard.  He is searching for a little piece of cheese we used to get him in the picture with the greens.

Patience is not actually burying his head in the chard. He is searching for a little piece of cheese we used to get him in the picture with the greens, which is pretty much the same approach we use to get people to eat them.

Greens, from arugula to sorrel, are easy to grow and very nutritious.  Why don’t we eat more of them?

Debby Sledgianowski, co-author (along with her mother, Patricia Mays) of the Garden Varieties Greens Cookbook, told me how people would come to the Garden Varieties table at the Colorado Farm and Art Market and ask how to prepare the lovely greens they sold.  They wanted to eat them, but didn’t know how.

Debby didn’t know how to cook the greens either. If you eat your product, you have nothing to sell!  She and her mother had to do some research and that led to this book.

6a280bb26804b2988e93f877b8c1395bd970b313-thumb-1

It’s $2.99 for the eBook. I thought the idea of an eCookbook was silly until Debby pointed out you can look up the ingredients on your phone at the grocery store.

Greens can be baked, boiled, braised or eaten raw. Boiling takes the bitterness out, but takes the nutrition out too.  The book offers a variety of recipes that combine the greens with other ingredients without stripping them of their nutritional wonders.

All of the recipes in the book are traditional recipes, which the authors expect you to modify to suit your own tastes.

“We think you should play with your food,” Debby told me.

Playing with vegetables and a camera is fun since they are so pretty.

Playing with vegetables and a camera is fun since they are so pretty.

Debby came to the Homestead last week and made two recipes from the book, a Savory Chard Galette and a Chard Apple Galette.

The Savory Chard Galette is made of braised greens, mustard and pine nuts.

The Savory Chard Galette is made of braised greens, mustard and swiss cheese.

We actually forgot to put the cheese on, but I don’t really like cooked cheese anyway.  It was delicious just as it was!

This is a "dessert galette" of braised greens with apples, raising and pine nuts.

This is a “dessert galette” of braised greens with apples, raisins and pine nuts.

Debby used red chard and yellow chard.  She explained that some people think the red chard is a little tangier and adds more flavor.

She used the milder white one for the Chard Apple Galette.

She used the milder yellow one for the Chard Apple Galette.

I have three copies of the “beta” version of the book to give away.  These are print copies that you can lay on the counter and stain with food while you’re cooking (that’s my preferred style of cookbook …. food-stained).  Leave a comment with your favorite green to enter the drawing and I’ll draw the winners on May 10th.

Or just go ahead and buy the eBook.  Try out the nutritious and tasty recipes and modify them to suit your personal tastes.

“If you have an open mind to eating vegetables,” says Debby, “you might just live a little longer.”

All it takes is an adventurous spirit and a little piece of cheese.

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© 2013 Hungry Chicken Homestead

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Meet the Farm and Art Market Vendors: Stone Creek Farmstead

Note:  One of the great things about Farmers Markets is the opportunity to get to know the people who provide us with food and locally made goods!  This is the first in what I hope will be a series about vendors at the Colorado Farm and Art Market.

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“It was a hobby gone terribly awry,” Dianna McMillan of Stone Creek Farmstead told me with a smile.

She's referring to the goats.  You can't have just one ...

She’s referring to the goats. You can’t have just one …

When Dianna invited me to visit the farmstead, I expected a small farm where all the buildings could be seen from one spot, like most of the other farms I’ve visited.  I drove up into the mountains and found this …

photo 5-114

It used to be a camp! Stone Creek is a stunningly beautiful 220 acre establishment.

Stone Creek Farmstead is a licensed dairy.  Dianna showed me around.

The main lodge includes a spotless kitchen.  This contraption is a state approved pasteurizing machine.

This contraption is a state approved pasteurizing machine.

They offer a variety of cheese, bread and soap classes.  The cheese classes include a wine/beer pairing session and every class includes a visit with the goats.  You can find a schedule on their website.

Several varieties of handmade hard cheese age in a special room.

Several varieties of handmade hard cheese age in a special room.

We drove over to the barn, about a mile away.  Despite my preference for walking, the drive was fun because in addition to the beautiful scenery I got to watch the unrestrained joy of one of the farm dogs as she ran alongside the truck.  My dog, riding along with me in the car, was madly jealous.

This is the barn.  It's the cleanest barn I've ever seen.

This is the barn. It’s the cleanest barn I’ve ever seen.

The McMillans built the barn especially for the dairy.

The goats are milked by machine, as the rules require.  This room, which looked like a spa shower room to me, is the milking room.

The goats are milked by machine, as the rules require. This room, which looked like a spa shower room to me, is the milking room.

I’d like to take a moment to thank everybody I met there for being so hospitable.  No one said a word about me being late (I have no idea how long it takes to get anywhere around here).

They gave me samples of all kinds of cheese!

They gave me samples of all kinds of cheese!

And they were incredibly nice to my dog, even though one of their dogs was none too pleased.

She had so much fun!

She had so much fun!  They even gave her some whey to drink!

The Farmstead has a store in the Main Lodge building and it’s open to the public a few times a year.

You can buy handmade cheese, soap, lotion, bread, crackers and eggs from their chickens.

You can buy handmade cheese, soap, lotion, bread, crackers and eggs from their chickens.

The Colorado Springs Local Foods Meetup has an outing scheduled for the next “Store Day” on May 11.  Join us for a visit to the Stone Creek goats and their store.

And now that you’ve been formally introduced, stop by at the Market and say hello!

(Who else will be at the Market?  Click to read about the Arkansas Valley Organic Growers.)

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© 2013 Hungry Chicken Homestead

Want to read about locally owned businesses in Colorado Springs? The chickens want to tell you about them! Join them in supporting our local economy by signing up for our twice-monthly newsletter!

 

It’s almost time for the Colorado Farm and Art Market!

I know it seems impossible, since right now it looks like this outside the window…

Look how fluffed up Roxanne chicken is.  It's cold!

Look how fluffed up Roxanne chicken is. It’s cold!

Wintry springtime weather notwithstanding, it’s still true.  The Colorado Farm and Art Market will be open for business in just over a month!  The first market will be on June 1 at the Margarita at Pine Creek!

Stay tuned for a review of the Garden Varieties Greens Cookbook, written by local greens grower Debby Sledgianowski.

You’ll be able to buy greens, like this kale. If you’re not sure what to do with them, stay tuned next week for a review of the Garden Varieties Greens Cookbook, written by local greens grower Debby Sledgianowski. (Click the picture to see the book now.)

An important thing to know about the Farm and Art Market is that it’s the only market in town where you can be assured that the produce is locally grown or the product is made right here in town.  When vendors apply, they must show that they are selling local products.

I know this is important because I went to another market a few years ago and directly asked a vendor if his vegetables were locally grown.  He assured me that they were and I bought them, distracted from inspecting them by the lively conversation.  When I got home, I found stickers with the word “California” on all the tomatoes!

I didn't have to worry about where these CFAM tomatoes were grown.

I didn’t have to worry about where these CFAM tomatoes were grown.

Earlier in the week I wrote about where to get locally grown produce right now.  Some of those vendors will also be at the Market.

You'll find Venetucci Farm there.

You’ll find Venetucci Farm there.

I talked to the new Market Manager, Nichole Fetterhoff (also the knitter of Nikki Stitch), yesterday.  She gave me a partial list of vendors.

Can't wait for these heirloom tomatoes!

Can’t wait for these heirloom tomatoes!

When you get there, you’ll find Frost Farms and A Joyful Noise Farm.  AVOG (Arkansas Valley Organic Growers) will be there too, selling produce from its members in the Arkansas Valley.  Lil’ Bit Farms will be there with goat milk shares and those coveted eggs.  Larga Vista Ranch, the raw cows milk dairy, will be at the Wednesday markets.

Milk, no fish oil... (This jar is from my Easter Egg Acres share)

Milk, no fish oil.
(This jar is from my Easter Egg Acres share … it’s important to properly credit the goats for their work.)

Speaking of the Wednesday markets, they will be held at Ivywild School this year!  You’ve probably heard how some of our local business owners are transforming the old elementary school into an entertainment and community center.  The Market will be held outside and you’ll be able to enjoy the businesses inside too!

A typical snack around here ...

A typical snack around here … I imagine the cafes in Ivywild will have some other things too.

The Market will be a destination, with live music, food and shopping.  You’ll find a number of vendors selling things like handmade soap, locally grown meat, locally roasted coffee and locally ground nut butter.

So go ahead and put it on your calendar right now!  I know it seems crazy with all that snow on the ground, but Market time is just around the corner!

(Wondering who will be at the Market this year?  Click for our Meet the Vendor series!)

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© 2013 Hungry Chicken Homestead

Want to read about locally owned businesses in Colorado Springs? The chickens want to tell you about them! Join them in supporting our local economy by signing up for our twice-monthly newsletter!

Nourish Organic Juice: The Store is Open!

It’s morning.  We’re hungry and in a hurry to get to work.  Sometimes it seems like the vending machine and its products of mysterious origin are the only options for a meal.

But wait!  What’s that?  It’s a carrot!  It’s an apple!

It’s the “Juice Girls”, come to the rescue!

Nourish Organic Juice has opened a long awaited Juice Bar & store!

Nourish Organic Juice has opened a long awaited Juice Bar & store!

Stop by the new Nourish Organic Juice store at 303 E. Pikes Peak for some real food.  It’s right on the southeast corner of Pikes Peak and Weber.

I’ve written about Nourish before and can confirm that the “Juice Girls” are just as inspiring and energetic as always.

They offer soup and salads with house-made dressings, to go with your juice.

They offer soup and salads with house-made dressings, as well as a daily fresh-pressed juice.

Are you on your way to work?  Grab a juice out of the cooler and your co-workers will envy you when you get to the office.

Are you on your way to work? Grab a juice out of the cooler and your co-workers will envy you while they open their sodas.

Evelyn and Nicole want you to be healthy and it shows in their product offerings.

Don't want to make your own kale chips? Stop in and pick some up!

Don’t want to make your own kale chips? Stop in and pick some up!

Besides the soups, salads and juices, they offer a variety of gluten-free products made in Colorado Springs.  In fact, nearly everything in the store is made here in town!

The cooler is stocked with products made by local folks at Vision Foods.

The cooler is stocked with products made by local folks at Vision Foods, including this Japanese salsa, Harley’s Hope Foundation products and Papa Joe’s Little Chalet dressing.

Nicole says they want to offer these products because people have been so good to them and they want to give back.  It doesn’t surprise me that people have been good to them.  It’s easy to be nice to such warm people.  Nor does it surprise me that they want to help others.  They’ve always been that way.

Looking for coffee?  They've got it!  They'll make you a pour-over cup from local roaster, Switchback.

Looking for coffee? They’ve got it! They’ll make you a pour-over cup from local roaster, Switchback.

I chatted with Nicole about her other job while Evelyn made a cup of coffee for me.  These ladies sure do work hard!

Nourish is a family business.  I tried to get a picture of Evelyn's little son running around while she made my coffee.

Nourish is a family business. I tried to get a picture of Evelyn’s little son running around while she made my coffee, but he is too fast.

I’m really excited about this shop.  I buy a Perky Pants carrot-ginger juice whenever I’m at Mountain Mama (one of the many local stores that sell Nourish Juice).  It’s nutritious and so good that I always wish I had another one when it’s gone.

Ready to head on over there?

The Colorado Springs Local Foods Meetup will meet over there on Saturday May 4 for lunch.  Why don’t you join us?  The food will be delicious and nutritious, and the company will be lively and entertaining.

It’s also a great opportunity to support this new local business.  Bring your friends!  We can promote the success of these two ladies who are working hard to make our community a better place!

We can all be well nourished superheroes together!

Come on in!

Come on in!

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© 2013 Hungry Chicken Homestead

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