Learn to make simple body products – or buy them from Simple Body

For some reason, I know a lot of people who can’t sleep. I don’t know if it’s politics or the dry climate or too much screen time, but they are up late. I’d like to use the first part of this post to recommend that they visit Simple Body for this product:

Simple Body FAce Serum

I haven’t actually tried it yet since the store isn’t open at 1AM, but it sounds like a really good idea.

I went to visit Simple Body to talk to Jewels Burdick, owner, tester and product-maker. Jewels is actually a professional graphic designer and if you’ve seen websites from Superfine Designs, she designed them.

“My whole life has been chaos,” she says, explaining how she came to be running a popular graphic design studio and a retail shop for which she makes all the products by hand.

Simple Body Deodorant

How Simple Body Got Started

In 2010, when Jewels was starting her fast-growing design studio, her mother had a health scare and they realized it was probably due to a common chemical, aluminum chloride. Jewels started looking for alternatives to the cosmetic product in which it is usually found … anti-perspirant.

Simple Body Deodorant 2

It’s easy enough to buy a deodorant that doesn’t have aluminum chloride in it, but it’s not anti-perspirant and they often don’t work as well as one would like. She tried 15 different brands, all expensive, and none of them worked.

What to Do When Nothing Works

What do resourceful people do when they can’t find an acceptable product? That’s right! They make their own. Jewels started making her own deodorant. It’s made from natural ingredients and melts easily on the skin. It also melts easily in the container too, in the summer, which is why you can buy it in a stick or in a jar.

Simple Body Lotion

What to Avoid

Jewels recommends a book called the Green Beauty Guide. It lists 100 ingredients that are toxic and helps you know what to avoid. Since it’s so hard to avoid all 100, Jewels started making other products like lotions, massage oils and baby care products.

Simple Body massage oil

It’s pretty amazing how she runs both businesses together. “Growing this business is important to me because I want to educate people,” she explains. “A lot of people don’t know! I also want to make a product that is affordable for everyone. It’s more about getting it into the  hands of people who care and are looking and can’t afford other alternatives.”

Simple Body scrub

It’s hard not to admire a person who works so hard for the benefit of others. It’s no easy task running a service business. I know this for a fact since I run a content writing business. Service work is detailed, it requires a lot of focus and clients can be exacting.

I can’t help but be a little awed that Jewels does all that and still finds a way to make time to make natural body care accessible to others.

Visit the website for classes and learn how you can make your own non-toxic body products straight from the expert! Or do what I do in these busy days and just visit the shop.
***

Note to the FCC: Jewels gave me a tube of her Healing Balm to try. It’s lovely, but my favorite product of hers is actually her clove deodorant, which I bought with money. Jewels also refers clients to my content writing business on occasion, but this doesn’t really affect my thoughts about deodorant.

***

copyright 2017 Hungry Chicken Homestead

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Five Products at Cole’s Gourmet Candy That Make You Feel Like a Kid in a Candy Store

How long does it take to feel like a kid at Cole’s Gourmet Candy after you walk in?

About 45 seconds.

candy-gift-baskets-colorado-springs

Cindy Cole greets you and takes you on a tour of this shop on N. Academy, across from Chapel Hills mall. Something strange happens as she shows you the bulk candy, the nostalgic sodas and the old-fashioned candies. You gradually change from a guarded adult to an excited 7 year old.

popcorn-shop-colorado-springs-4

Except this time you’ve got money and you can buy whatever you want.

Cindy finishes the tour and starts giving you samples. Try this popcorn we make here in the shop! Try this house-made fudge! Try a bit of this house-made popsicle called a paleta!

The shop is a little oasis of happiness in a stressful world. Here are five products that will make you happy, whether you eat them or not!

  1. Root Beer

Cole’s has what must be the most comprehensive selection of root beer in the state! I can’t remember how many different kinds they have, but they covered several shelves.

old-fashioned-sodas-colorado-springs-2

They don’t just have root beer. The shop carries all kinds of old-fashioned sodas, including some flavors I’d never heard of before!

old-fashioned-sodas-colorado-springs

2. Moon Pies

I’ve read about Moon Pies, but had never actually seen one. Did you know they come in chocolate flavor?

moon-pie-colorado-springs

I also found Ice Cubes, weird flavors of gum and a selection of candies made in Colorado, such as Hammonds of Denver. Cole’s carries bulk candies as well, including a childhood favorite of mine, Jordan Almonds.

3. Chocolate Covered Popcorn with Sea Salt

Who came up with this idea? This stuff satisfies cravings for both sweet and salty food at the same time!

popcorn-shop-colorado-springs-3

It’s just plain dangerous to keep this in the house and I can say the same about the Extra Buttery popcorn. I brought home a small bag of it, but nobody else got to taste it. I ate it all before the other residents of the Homestead even knew it existed.

homemade-popcorn

I swear I didn’t mean to. It just happened.

Cole’s carries dozens of popcorn flavors, from cinnamon to bacon cheddar to caramel cashew. The menu is two pages long. All of their popcorns are made in the store in a fascinating mixing machine, but that’s a story for another blog.

popcorn-shop-colorado-springs-2

4. Paletas

Paletas are the popsicles you would make if you didn’t just buy them from the ice cream truck. They are made out of fruit and cane sugar with additions of coconut milk and rice milk for creamy versions.

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The paletas are made in-house, with organic ingredients whenever possible. They are colorful, flavorful and fun! You can try a sample before choosing a flavor.

5. Fudge with Silly Names

Don’t ask me why, but the “Moose Poo” flavor of fudge is very popular. It comes in a set with other moose-themed flavors during the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays, but you can also get it by the pound.

I went with the more traditional chocolate fudge.

homemade-fudge

All of the fudge is made in-house and samples are available.

The owners, Cindy and Tom, tell a story that describes how you feel at the end of your visit. A lady and her husband came in once and bought a huge bag of popcorn. As they were leaving, the lady exclaimed, “We need more of this!”

“What do you mean?”, retorted her husband. “You’ve already got a huge bag.”

“No,” she responded, gesturing to the store itself. “More of this.”

And she’s right. A little more delight makes the world a much better place.

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***

Note: I got this interview with Tom and Cindy because Colorado Springs digital marketing firm Uzu Media hired me to write the content for Cole’s new website. The fact that I am being paid and am acting like a responsible grownup does not affect my written opinion of the shop or of Cindy’s magical power to make you feel like a happy child once in the store. 

***

copyright 2016 Hungry Chicken Homestead

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Colorado Springs Local Business: Frog on a Limb Primitives

What is a primitive? You’re probably asking yourself that question and rest assured that I wondered too. I also asked Jessica, the owner of Frog on a Limb Primitives in Monument, CO, but the answer quickly faded in importance thanks to Jessica’s distracting homemade candy.

Colorado Springs homemade candy

I know. I should pay closer attention, but at some point during our discussion of how primitives are a style of decor in which old things made into something new with a vintage look, we began to discuss how they are made. Jessica makes the lion’s share of the items in the store and she was telling me how she learned from her great-grandmother, grandmother, mother and her father.

“From the time I could pull a stool to a sewing machine, I have been doing this,” she explained.

Colorado Springs homesteading store

One of the things she does is make mixes for baked goods and candy. She makes the packages, like the one above, herself.

This is about as far as we got because at that point she opened up a handmade package and gave me a piece of her homemade candy. It was a huge piece of bavarian cream brittle.

“Here. Try this,” she said, handing me this generous piece of candy.

“Oh, my,” I thought to myself. “How am I going to decline to eat this much sugar before lunch without offending her.”

I took the candy and delicately tasted it. Jessica continued telling her story about staying with her grandparents as a kid, where they gardened, carved soap, made wreaths and salt dough instead of watching TV or playing video games. I tasted the candy again, eventually holding it between my teeth as I took notes.

And then the candy took over. I was committed. It was too big to talk around and too tasty to waste.

It takes a long time to eat that much brittle and it’s hard to focus on anything else while you’re enjoying it. I’m sure everyone will understand when I say I didn’t really get the rest of the story, but I did take a lot of pictures and can show you what’s in the store.

Colorado Springs Homesteading store 2

Handmade Cake candles!

Handmade candles

Handmade rolled candles

Chocolate Merlot Cake Mix

Chocolate Merlot Cake Mix

Handmade spice blends

Handmade tea & spice blends

Local Honey!

Local Honey!

Oh no! More candy!

Oh no! More candy!

Colorado flour, sugar and even black pepper!

Colorado flour, sugar and even black pepper!

You’ll also want to know that they offer Colorado meats, including bison and chicken.

Colorado meat

And they offer classes.

Colorado Springs Homesteading Classes

As of this writing, here is the schedule…

April 23 straw bale gardening 2pm – 4pm
April 30 candlemaking 12 noon – 4pm
May 7 straw bale gardening 2pm – 4pm
May 28 canning class. Bread and butter pickles 12 noon – 4pm

Visit the shop at 341 Front Street in Monument, CO (a block north of Main St. in Old Monument) or call them at 719-481-8888 to sign up

And whatever you do, don’t eat the candy until after the class or you won’t learn anything!

***

©Hungry Chicken Homestead 2016

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Colorado Springs Local Business: Furry Friends Pet Food & Delivery

“Wow, those cookies look really good!”, murmured a fellow shopper at Furry Friends. “I want to eat one.”

“Sometimes people do eat them,” replied Debbie Brookham, co-owner of Furry Friends Inc. an adorable pet supply shop at Woodmen and Rangewood roads in northern Colorado Springs. “They are meant for dogs, but are fine for people too, even if they are a little surprised at how they taste.”
Dog Food Delivery Colorado Springs 1

We laughed, but that didn’t stop me from wanting to eat them.

This family business started out as a franchise of another business back in 2002. Debbie’s life has followed a similar trajectory to mine, making it fun to talk to her.

“I used to work in the corporate world,” Debbie would say.

“So did I!”, I would say.

“I got burnt out.”

“So did I!”

“I knew there was something out there where I could share my love for the dogs and make a living.”

“Me too! …. Ok, well, share my hilarity at the chickens, at least.”

And so on.

The Brookham family really know dogs and soon disengaged from the franchise, wanting the freedom to do better. They began by creating their own blend of food with a pet food nutritionist. They had plenty of testers and it was certain that the food would be well-regarded by dogs.

“I grew up with dogs,” she explains. “When we downsized, I just told people we got smaller dogs…but we got more of them!”

Dog Food Delivery Colorado Springs 2

Once the dogs had approved the food, they began delivering it, much to the delight of pet owners from Pueblo to Denver! They have their own brands of food for dogs in different stages of life and different needs. They even consult with people on the best way to feed their furry friends.

“Our mission is to create healthy lives by bringing people and pets together through good nutrition,” Debbie explained. As a person whose best friend is a cat with an outsized personality, this makes sense to me. The healthier Patience the Cat is, the less I fret.

Furry Friend

Debbie loves meeting people and as much as she enjoys the dog food delivery business, she wanted to help people and their pets more directly. Opening the store was a way to do this.

Not only can you buy food and toys off the shelf at Furry Friends, but you can wash your dog! The “Beach Club” has several human-waist-high tubs with steps leading up, making it easy for bather and bathee.

Dog Food Delivery Colorado Springs 3

They have a floor level shower too, for the biggest dogs.

Dog Food Delivery Colorado Springs 4

Visit Furry Friends at 3586 C Hartsel Dr.  Colorado Springs, CO 80920 or call the store: 719-495-7387. You can also request a free sample of their food.

You know what else Debbie told me? Furry Friends could add chicken feed to their delivery offerings if there is enough interest. I hope you’re interested because I sure am! Take this one-question survey to let us know what you think!

***

©Hungry Chicken Homestead 2016

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Colorado Springs Local Business: Frayla Boutique

Tina Schwaner said something about her business, Frayla Boutique & Hair Salon, that no one ever said to me before, though it seems obvious now…

“This feeds my love for shopping.”

Colorado Springs Local Business Frayla 3I always think to myself that I don’t like shopping, but it’s not entirely true.  I love poking around in shops with unique handmade and local items.  And honestly, though I dress like a person who is conflicted over modern fashion’s approach to modesty, age appropriateness and the ever-impending CrossFit workout, I actually love pretty clothes.

Colorado Springs Local Business Frayla 1Tina’s boutique is a great place to look around.  Frayla is a small, friendly hair salon (Tina is the only stylist).  She recounted how clients sometimes arrived early when she used to rent a booth in another salon.  Tina, a warm and thoughtful person, wanted everyone to feel welcome and enjoyed how waiting clients would participate in the conversation with her and her current client.

But wouldn’t it be nice, she thought to herself, if they could browse through interesting treasures at the same time?

Colorado Springs Local Business Frayla 6Frayla Boutique became a reality when she rented a space on E. Cheyenne Rd, between S. Cascade and Nevada.

Colorado Springs Local Business Frayla 10The best part of the little boutique, in my opinion, is the variety of handmade, local and fair trade items.  I found glass beads made by Colorado Springs artist Michelle Hair of New Earth Beads.

Colorado Springs Local Business Frayla 9

Frayla carries Giving Keys, a project that employs people transitioning out of homelessness.  You choose a key that speaks to you and wear it until you meet someone that seems to need it more.

Colorado Springs Local Business Frayla 4Tina notes that she’s bought and given away a lot of keys.

Colorado Springs Local Business Frayla 7Frayla also carries Made with a Mission candles.  Made with a Mission recycles glass bottles into candles.  They have a partnership with the Springs Rescue Mission here in Colorado Springs.  Tina points out that if you buy a Made with a Mission candle and a Giving Key, you’ve supported three women owned businesses, employed homeless people in two states, upcycled a bottle and a key and you’ve given back to a local mission.  Not bad for one stop shopping!

Lotion Bar Cafe is also in Colorado Springs.

Lotion Bar Cafe is also in Colorado Springs.

Stop in at Frayla, even if you don’t need your hair done.  As Tina says, you’ll find Fashion with a Conscience!

Check the Facebook page before you go.  Remember, this is a one-woman shop.  You don't want to miss out if she steps out.

Check the Facebook page before you go. Remember, this is a one-woman shop. You don’t want to miss out if she steps out.

***

©Hungry Chicken Homestead 2015

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Colorado Springs Local Business: The Sound Shop

My late husband once filmed two of our cats wrestling.  In those days, you had to hook up the camera to a television to see the recording and he had done this with a ten inch television on the floor.  One of the cats sat down in front of it and watched intently.  He even jumped at a surprising moment in the action.

“So that’s why they never watch TV,” my husband mused.  “It’s not that they can’t see it.  It’s that there was never anything good on until now.”

I can only imagine what Spot the Cat would have though of seeing himself on one of today's televisions.

I can only imagine what Spot the Cat would have thought of seeing himself on one of today’s televisions.

I sent the last of the old televisions off to the recycler about two years ago.  I just watch the chickens whenever I need entertainment.

As entertainment equipment goes, this is more my style.

As entertainment equipment goes, this is more my style.

With all that in mind, you can imagine my bewilderment when I walked into The Sound Shop on Cimarron St. for the first time.  Action and sound surrounded me from every angle!

I didn't even try pushing the buttons to see and hear the displays.

I didn’t even try pushing the buttons to see and hear the displays.

I asked owner Patty Jakos how she came to be the the owner of this very exciting place.

“I worked here part time when my kids were growing up,” she explained.  “When the previous owner retired, I bought it.  I didn’t want to work for anyone else.”

It’s quite a transition to go from employee to owner, but she likes it.  “The nice thing about this job is everything we do is entertainment,” she said.  “It’s all fun stuff.  It’s meant to make your life more enjoyable.”

“Kind of like chickens,” I thought to myself.

The Sound Shop sells all kinds of stuff, from home theater systems to simple speakers.

The Sound Shop sells all kinds of stuff, from home theater systems to simple speakers.

We talked a long time about the things you can buy from this locally owned shop.  They have equipment all along the cost spectrum.  They have televisions and sound systems and the equipment you need to network it all together.

They even have some used equipment on hand.

They even have some used equipment on hand.

Now you might wonder why you should go there instead of just ordering off the Internet.  I could tell you how The Sound Shop saves you from a lot of time spent doing research and from making mistakes because they already have the expertise to build what you want.  I could tell you how they know how to work within your budget.  Or I could tell you this story…

My house has speakers in the ceiling.  I know where they connect, but I have never seen this particular type of connector in my life.  Several people have attempted to figure out how I could make those speakers useful, but they still languish, unused and mysterious.

I told Patty about this and she told me about a service they offer.  A technician from the shop comes out to your house, looks at whatever you want to do and makes recommendations.  They do this for free.

I made an appointment and Scott the Technician came out.  He showed up on time, looked at the connectors and then explained exactly what I would need.  When he got back to the shop he sent me a quote for the equipment, which they would come out and install.  In one fell swoop, he solved the mystery!

You can stop in at The Sound Shop to have your own mysteries resolved.  It makes sense.  Why spend a lot of time researching and buying from someone far away when you can get what you want a lot faster and with less risk by buying local?

***

©Hungry Chicken Homestead 2015

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Colorado Springs Local Business: Rocky Mountain Soap Market

As you may recall, soap is very important on a homestead.

Their relative, bath bombs, are important too, but we can get along without them in a pinch.  Not so with soap.

Their cousins, bath bombs, are important too, but we can get along without them in a pinch. Not so with soap.

With that in mind, I was delighted to discover a new soap shop on Tejon St.!  The Rocky Mountain Soap Market recently opened its doors, releasing delightfully clean smells out onto the street.

(Note, do not confuse this with the Rocky Mountain Soap Company.  As far as I can tell, those soaps have nothing at all to do with our Rocky Mountains).

The Rocky Mountain Soap Market is Jennifer Ross’s store.  She explained how she became the proprietor of a soap shop after a career as a math teacher.

“I am a math person,” she said.  “That’s why I liked making soap in the first place… because there was so much math to it!”

The next time a young person asks you why math is important you can tell him no shower would ever be complete without math.

The next time a young person asks you why math is important you can tell him no shower would ever be complete without math.

After making her first batch of soap and falling in love with it, Jennifer worked towards perfecting the process.  “The first batch turned out terrible,” she explained, “But I loved the process and challenge of figuring out why it didn’t work!”

Soapmaking is creative as well as exacting.

Soapmaking is creative as well as exacting.

She makes all the soap in the shop.  You can choose from “Natural”, “Nearly Natural” and “Organic” soaps.

You can also build your own bath salt assortment or request lotion made to order.

You can also build your own bath salt assortment or request lotion made to order.

When I walked in she asked me to smell a lotion she was making and explained that one of the odd side effects of spending all day in a soap shop is that she becomes insensitive to scents.

For the record, it smelled wonderful.

For the record, it smelled wonderful.

Jennifer took her soaps to craft fairs, farmers markets and other events, but she wanted something more permanent.  When the Downtown Partnership called to offer her space for a shop, she jumped on it!

“I really feel like this is where God wants me to be,” she said.

In addition to soap, bath salts and lotions; you can buy a gift basket at the shop.

In addition to soap, bath salts and lotions; you can buy a gift basket at the shop.

By the way, Jennifer confirmed something we already know about locally owned businesses.  She chooses what to make by listening to her customers!  For example, a customer wondered if a  patchouli lime soap would be nice.  The next time Jennifer set out to make a batch of soap, guess what she made?  And it IS nice!

You know what that means.

You know what that means.

It’s a good reminder that small business owners are listening to your input.  You get custom, expertly made products with superb customer service from local businesses.  Forget Black Friday.  We’ve got better shopping to do!

(Note to the FTC:  I bought a bar of unscented coffee soap from the shop on my first visit.  I raved about it to Jennifer and she gave me an almond scented coffee soap bar as a gift.  I'll rave about that too.)

(Note to the FTC: I bought a bar of unscented coffee soap from the shop on my first visit. I raved about it to Jennifer and she gave me an almond scented coffee soap bar as a gift. Believe me, I’ll rave about that too.  It’s wonderful!)

***

©Hungry Chicken Homestead 2014

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Colorado Springs Local Business: Purple Mountain Hydroponics

I asked the same question I always ask at the end of the interview.

“Is there anything else you’d like people to know?”

“I just want people to know how great hydroponic growing systems are for vegetables and flowers,” responded Brian Keenan of Purple Mountain Hydroponics.  “There’s nothing like coming home to a room full of living flowers in the dead of winter.”  Then he grimaced and lowered his voice.  “When people hear about hydroponics, they only think of one thing.”

I grimaced back and nodded knowingly, but to tell the plain truth I had no idea what he was talking about.  I didn’t figure it out until later.

Disney World.

Disney World is the only other place I’ve ever seen plants grown without soil.  I don’t remember which park had the systems, I only remember riding around in a little tram and looking at plants growing in nothing, virtually in mid-air.  It had background music and a calm, disembodied voice spoke about a space-age future.  The whole thing had an air of expectancy.

I can imagine how hard it is for a local shop to compete with that.  They don’t even have a tram.

Colorado Springs Local Business Purple Mountain Hydroponics Growing Tent

They do have this space-age-looking thing I like to call the Vegetable Isolation Chamber. You can put in a light, zip it up and your plants think it’s summer!

Besides being a haven for winter weary vegetables, the shop is also a great example of teamwork.  In 2009, Brian and his friend Hondo were tired of working outdoors.  Brian was a landscape irrigation specialist who had started his career building log houses after he got out of the Army and made his way into landscape work.  Hondo was on a similar trajectory and they both had the same goal.  They  wanted to make a living without doing hard labor.

Colorado Springs Local Business Purple Mountain Hydroponics Tomatoes

Let the vegetables do all the work! These tomato plants were taller than me! In April!

Taking their outdoor landscaping experience indoors was a way to use what they knew to make the life they wanted.  Brian notes that retail had a learning curve.

“We went into it blindly,” he says.  “We knew where we wanted to go with it, but not how much work it really takes to run a store.”

Colorado Springs Local Business Purple Mountain Hydroponics Bat Guano

For example, they have to keep an eye on the bat guano supply.

How did they handle it?  They recruited several friends and relatives to work in the shop for a percentage of the business.  Each member of the partnership is personally invested in its success and has incentive to learn as much as he can about the products.

“The only way we make it is through customer service,” Brian points out.  He knows we could order these same products through a faceless online retailer. He and his business partners form relationships with customers, turning indoor gardening into a community activity where people share their successes and help each other solve problems.

Colorado Springs Local Business Purple Mountain Hydroponics Lettuce

Here is some successful-looking lettuce. It grows in a non-nutritive medium and comes back within a week if you cut it down and eat it!

Jealousy over the fresh lettuce makes me think about trying this “aquaponics without fish” here on the Homestead.  I don’t have a tram either, but maybe I can get the lettuce to grow without one.

***

© 2013 Hungry Chicken Homestead

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Buckley’s Homestead Supply is Growing

Have you been to Buckley’s Homestead Supply lately?

We all get a little excited when we go in there.

We all get a little excited when we go in there.

If you haven’t been there for a class or to pick up chicken feed recently, I recommend stopping by.

Stop by, but maybe without your wallet.  Somehow, I always end up with some fabulous article I didn't mean to buy when I went in.  Here is Exhibit A, a 5 quart cast iron dutch oven that recently became part of my kitchen.

Stop by, but maybe without your wallet. Somehow, I always end up with some coveted article I didn’t mean to buy when I went in. Here is Exhibit A, a 5 quart cast iron dutch oven that  became part of my kitchen when I attended a bee class in the store on Saturday.

You’ll remember from the last article that Buckley’s is owned by Ed and Allison Buckley.  Their story always reminds me of the classic immigrant story, except that they’re not immigrants.  I think Ed is from the east coast and Allison might even be a native of Colorado.  Ed works nights for a local dairy and Allison is a teacher.  They run their old-fashioned-looking store and their homestead as a team.  When you go into the store, you can imagine them living above it.

They don’t actually live there, but imagining that they do adds to the homespun atmosphere.

So does this array of cast iron pans.  I tell you, someday I will own them all!

So does this array of cast iron pans. I tell you, someday I will own them all!

Ed and Allison started the store simply because they saw a need and an opportunity.  Allison explains how they got to wondering why there were no feed stores on the west side, even though that’s where most of urban chickens in this town live.

Here is an incubator hatching more west side chickens!  Donna La Chey of Hillbilly Farms is teaching a chick hatching class there soon.

Here is an incubator hatching more west side chickens! Donna La Chey of Hillbilly Farms is teaching a chick hatching class there on Feb. 8, 2014.

The store is growing every month.  Allison attributes this to word of mouth and the fact that they are always bringing in new kinds of merchandise.

“I want to know what you want in this store,” she says.  And this curiousity has served them well.  They learn about all sorts of homesteading skills and supplies when people come in looking for them.

Soapmaking has become a very popular activity and Buckley's carries everything from essential oils to natural powders for color.

Soapmaking has become a very popular activity and Buckley’s carries everything from essential oils to natural powders for color.

These are

Here are some examples of those colorants … Beet Root Powder, Indigo Powder and Tomato Powder.

They also have silicon and plastic molds.  This is my favorite.

They also have silicon and plastic molds. This is my favorite.

Fermenting has also picked up in popularity.  Here is a three gallon fermenting crock standing next to a ten gallon fermenting crock.  That's a lot of pickles!

Fermenting has also picked up in popularity. Here is a three gallon fermenting crock standing next to a ten gallon fermenting crock. That’s a lot of pickles!

Buckley’s hosts classes where you can learn homesteading skills.  Visit their website for a schedule of classes or stop in and check out the board.  You can buy some chicken or goat feed while you’re there and they’ll carry it to your car for you!

But be careful.  If you’re anything like me, chances are you’ll come out with something else that you weren’t looking for when you went in.

***

© 2013 Hungry Chicken Homestead

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Hunt or Gather at IvyWild

Hungry?

HGCooler1

 

Wondering where to get locally sourced food without foraging for lambs quarter and purslane or trying to catch a rabbit?

HGCooler2

 

The Pikes Peak Community Foundation and Ivywild School have just the thing to solve your problem!

Hunt or Gather is open!

Hunt or Gather is open!

Hunt or Gather, located in Ivywild School next to the Principal’s Office, connects local consumers with food grown or made within a 300 mile radius of Colorado Springs.  That can include all sorts of things, from fruit grown in Paonia, CO to vegetables grown in Pueblo, CO to pasture raised beef grown near the Kansas border to salsa made right here in the Springs.  It’s food you could go get yourself on a day trip, if only you could make several such day trips a month.

I was surprised at the variety of foods available!

I was surprised at the variety of foods available!

“It’s kind of a local garage sale of food,” explained Megan Andreozzi-Harris, the manager and driving force behind Hunt or Gather.  The food in the store comes from local farms, local kitchens and also from urban homesteaders.

Home gardeners can sell their produce in the store, alongside the farm-raised produce.  Contact Megan for details.

Home gardeners can sell their produce in the store, alongside the farm-raised produce. Contact the store for details.

Not only does the store sell food, but they’ll help you find the food you are looking for!

Stay tuned to hear about classes!

A Buying Club!

I’m excited about the Buying Club!  A buying club means being able to buy enough local produce to preserve it for the winter and eat local all year round.  I want people to have access to the wonderful food grown around here and even tried starting a club myself, but I got frustrated when I couldn’t find an efficient way to make it work.

Imagine how happy I was when Megan told me Hunt or Gather would have a buying club!  The store already has the systems in place to order the food you want and they have a place to hold it for you when it’s delivered.

It’s the perfect opportunity for canners to get enough local, seasonal produce to preserve!

If you preserve your own food for winter, I highly recommend attending the upcoming organizational meeting for Hunt or Gather’s buying club.  It will be at the store on August 23 at 4PM.  Contact Megan at mandreozzi@ppcf.org to RSVP.

If you don't have your own bees, visit the store for local honey.

If you don’t have your own bees, visit the store for local honey.

Keep an eye on the Hunt or Gather schedule too!  They’ll have classes on cooking, gardening and food preservation.  A Grand Opening is planned for a weekend in the near future.

HGMeat

 

Check out this edible garage sale when you visit the Farm and Art Market this week.  You can hunt and gather your way to dinner and never even get dirty!

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© 2013 Hungry Chicken Homestead

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