Meet the Farm and Art Vendors: Venetucci Farm

Venetucci Farm has been the setting for many of my adventures in Colorado Springs.  I teach canning classes next to their farm-stand.  I volunteer to look for bugs with school groups and weed fields.  It was the location of last year’s impromptu chicken parade.

And yet I've never written a "Meet the Vendor" article about them.

And yet I’ve never written a “Meet the Vendor” article about them.

It’s time to fix that!

Just like we might fix up onions for the farmers market!

Just like we might fix up onions for the farmers market!

I want you to picture this interview.  It took place on a kind of covered porch during a rainstorm.  I interviewed one of the farmers, Susan, while she washed beets destined for the Farm and Art market and managed a volunteer staff doing similar tasks.

The other farmers, Patrick and Kym, were not present.  They were probably out in a field somewhere working hard and getting drenched.

The other farmers, Patrick and Kym, were not present. They were probably out in a field somewhere working hard and getting drenched.

Susan explained that the farm has three parts to its mission, which I’ll paraphrase here.

  1. Grow healthy food for the community.
  2. Provide meaningful education and volunteer opportunities that connect the community with our food.
  3. Continue the legacy of generosity begun by Nick and Bambi Venetucci.
You can get that healthy food in a variety of ways.

You can get that healthy food in a variety of ways.

If you’re on the ball, you can sign up for their CSA and get a share of produce every week!  I say you have to be on the ball because it sells out every year and prior members get first dibs.

All is not lost if you find yourself on the waiting list, though.  You can find Venetucci at the Farm and Art Market with fresh produce every Wednesday and Saturday.  Or you can visit the farm between 9AM and 1PM on Saturdays and buy meat and produce directly from their on-site farm-stand.

They sell farm raised pork and beef by the cut at the farm-stand.  You can also buy this pasture raised meat in bulk.  Don’t delay if you’re thinking of ordering!  This is no feedlot.  The number of animals is limited to what the land can support.

While you're at the farm shopping, why not volunteer?

While you’re at the farm shopping, why not volunteer?  Volunteers built this wild bee house.  Look closely.  See the holes with bits of leaves?  Bees did that!  They stuff the holes with eggs and leaves, which will turn into more bees!

Venetucci offers a variety of volunteer opportunities and I highly recommend taking advantage of them if you want to grow your own food here in the high desert.  All the time I was supposedly “selflessly volunteering my time”, I was quite selfishly learning enough to get my own garden to grow out here.  The farmers and the education coordinator, David Rudin, are a wealth of knowledge and very generous with sharing it.

My garden doesn't look like this yet, though.

My garden doesn’t look like this yet, though.

The farm carries on the legacy of the Venetucci family by continuing to serve the community. They still give away 10,000 pumpkins to young children every year.  The farm is smaller now and water is more scarce since Nick and Bambi’s time, but it still welcomes the community.

A tiny pumpkin!

A tiny pumpkin!

And it’s still a great place for adventures in farming.

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© 2013 Hungry Chicken Homestead

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