Colorado Larkburgers, $2 on April 6 (and not made of larks)!

Note:  I was asked if I’d like to write about Larkburger because the one-year anniversary of their Colorado Springs store is this month.  Head over there on Saturday (April 6).  They’ll be selling larkburgers for $2 apiece!

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Quick!  What’s the Colorado State Bird?

Yes!  The Lark Bunting!

What’s this?

Correct!  It's a Larkburger.

Correct! It’s a Larkburger.

Coincidence?

I put this question to Adam Baker, one of the founders of Larkburger.  Larkburger, a Colorado company, is the biggest local business I’ve written about.  I was excited to do the interview because it’s the success story all of our local businesses can be!

A stunning Colorado sky and a local logo.

A stunning Colorado sky and a local logo.

Baker, along with Nancy Sweeney and Chef Thomas Salamunovich, started Larkburger in Edwards, CO (near Vail) about seven years ago.

“Why would anyone start a fast food restaurant?”, you may be asking (as I did).  It’s already been done.

Witness the tuna burger, made of sashimi grade tuna, the hand-made larkburger and fries with parmesan and truffle oil!

Witness the tuna burger, made of sashimi grade tuna, the hand-made larkburger and fries with parmesan and truffle oil!

Turns out, it’s not fast food!  They deliver it quickly, but someone in the kitchen actually formed my burger into a proper-sized patty and cooked it.  The sauces and dressing are all made on the premises.

“So a person with a name actually made my lunch?”, I said to Kathy Liberacki, the Colorado Springs store manager.

“Yup!”, she said cheerfully, setting down my tray of two sandwiches and fries.  She had recommended the tuna burger and, of course, I had to try the signature larkburger too.

Oh, truffle fries, you bring me such delight!  ... They are sprinkled with parmesan cheese, truffle oil and parsley.

Oh, truffle fries, you bring me such delight! … They are sprinkled with parmesan cheese, truffle oil and parsley.

I ate everything and felt like I’d gotten a good meal.  It even seemed a little fancy, despite the cardboard.

Once Adam told me the story, it all made sense.  The trio of founders had owned an upscale restaurant for vacationers called “Larkspur”, but whenever they went out for lunch, they couldn’t find anything wholesome and quick.

What do restaurant owners do when they need a quick lunch?  They open a restaurant!

They brought over the high-quality hamburger and fry recipes from the Larkspur.  I like the idea that they are bringing good food from the vacation-spot restaurant to people with the limited time and funds of the workday.

I like the spare, cabin-like look of the place.  Bright colors around food make me nervous.

I like the spare, cabin-like colors of the place. Bright colors around food make me nervous.

“I have to ask you one more question,” I told Adam, after we had talked about Larkburger’s origins.

“Sure!”, he said, accommodatingly.

“Are larkburgers made of larks?”

He grimaced good-naturedly.  No doubt, he’s seen a barrel of lark jokes 6 feet high and 3 feet wide by now.

“It’s just a name,” he said.  “We called it ‘Larkburger’ after the ‘Larkspur’.”

It’s a good answer, but I disagree.  Larkburger is a Colorado small-business success story.    Why not name it after the state bird and let it be an example of our Colorado spirit?

Fly on, Larkburger, and show them what we can do!

photo 2-172

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© 2013 Hungry Chicken Homestead

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