Chickens Love Colorado Springs!

IMG_2069-300x225Welcome to Hungry Chicken Homestead! Ten hungry chickens live here as well as some other animals, and people who know where the food is stored.

The chickens love Colorado Springs and want to tell you about local farms and small businesses right here in our community!  Chickens know a thing or two about the importance of a good flock and good things to eat.  Likewise, people benefit from knowing their neighbors and knowing where to get good food!

Look around!  You’ll find stories about Colorado businesses and farms, stories about the Homestead and even listings telling you where to buy food grown or produced right here in our neck of the woods.

Wondering what to do with all that local food you can buy?  We offer food preservation and cooking classes too!

Do you own a business in Colorado Springs? The chickens write this blog and they can write your blog too!

Sign up for Chickens on the Mailing List to get the class schedule, information about Colorado Springs locally owned businesses and homesteading events in your inbox!

We hope you’ll find a little inspiration for your own story too!

Colorado Springs Local Business: Made with a Mission

“I feel like it’s essential for people to know they have a purpose.”

That’s a quote from Laura Cameron, founder of Made with a Mission. Here is another.

“Everything we do is done in excellence. We never wanted to do something that was second rate.”

In other words, you can make a good product AND make a difference. That’s exactly what Laura and Made with a Mission are doing.

Because they have found ways to do more world-improving things in a day than I manage in a week!

This social enterprise specializes in high quality candles made from recycled bottles.

Here is how it works.

First, Made with a Mission collects old bottles.

Look at all those bottles! Imagine what that would be like in a landfill.

Look at all those bottles! Imagine what that would be like in a landfill.

Then they send the bottles to another local business to be cut, polished and annealed. That business is Wine Punts Drinking glasses, also located on Las Vegas St. Apparently, they heat the glass to something like 900°F to harden and smooth it, making a strong and safe container.

Made with a Mission fills the jars with cosmetic-grade wax that was made in North America and chemical-free scents. The result is strong, nonpoisonous and attractive.

That saves a lot of trouble!

And matches come with every candle!

But that’s not the best part. Made with a Mission has been working with the Springs Mission for two years to become a partner in programs that help people in poverty get on their feet. Today, the Springs Mission owns 49% of Made with a Mission, which translates to financial support for this local nonprofit every time someone buys a candle.

Or anything else. Made with a Mission sells gift baskets and caramels too.

Or anything else. Made with a Mission sells gift baskets and caramels too.

In time, Springs Mission clients may be involved in the production of Made with a Mission products, as part of the program to help people reintegrate into society.

“We feel like this product tells our story, something thrown away is repurposed and has meaning again,” says Laura.

That story began in an unexpected place … the luxury handbag market. Laura and her sister love luxury handbags and they started their first business after buying a fancy bag at a garage sale for $2. They had it cleaned and fixed then sold it for $30.

“I know what luxury looks like,” she said. She’s applied those standards to the candle business, knowing that customers like high-quality products. “We wanted them to buy it because it’s really good, not just to support a cause.”

I'm burning this candle right now and the room smells like mandarin & clove.

I’m burning this candle right now and the room smells like mandarin & clove.

The Gazette recently published an article about Made with a Mission’s collaboration with the Springs Mission. You can buy Made with Mission’s products on their website, at Frayla Boutique or in an increasing number of stores.

Wherever you get it, it won’t be second rate, but it will help give people a second chance.

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©Hungry Chicken Homestead 2016

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WWII Era Chocolate Cake

Let me start by explaining that, for once, we did not make this recipe up. We adapted it from a recipe on the ever-helpful King Arthur Flour Company recipe site.

imageNot only do they have the original recipe, made vegan due to shortages of milk & eggs, but they also have a helpful explanation of how to adapt recipes for high altitude.

I don’t know exactly why we decided to make a chocolate cake, but I do know that members of the household have forbidden me from ever making it again.

Why? Is it too dry? Does it taste weird?

Actually, it’s too good. We just can’t stop eating it and nobody needs to eat half a chocolate cake in one sitting!

I adapted the recipe for what was in my kitchen and to work at 6,000 ft. My goal was a nice smooth cake with no collapsed section in the middle.

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I accomplished the goal with a few tricks:

  • I used 3/4 of the leavener called for (baking soda)
  • I used extra water & less sugar
  • I turned up the heat by 25 degrees and shortened the cook time

Why does this help? Because our baking problems at altitude are caused by the thin air. Really! It sounds crazy, but it’s true. The air isn’t as heavy as it is at sea level and baked goods rise too fast. Quick breads and cakes tend to rise larger than the structure can support and they collapse like a soap bubble blown by an enthusiastic kid.

Reducing the leavener decreases the rising power. Using extra water thins the batter and reduces the rising potential. The sugar, interestingly enough, tends to weaken the cake structure and turning up the heat causes the batter to set more quickly, giving it less time to over-rise.

That’s the science behind the smooth cake top, in a nutshell. Now, let’s get to my version of the recipe.

Ingredients:

Cake:

1 1/2 cups all purpose flour
3/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup cocoa
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon espresso powder
3/4 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3/4 teaspoon vinegar
1/3 cup coconut oil
1 1/8 cup water

Frosting:

1 1/2 cups vegan chocolate chips
1/3 cup cold coffee

1. Preheat the oven to 375˚F. Lightly grease an 8″ square or 9″ round pan that’s at least 2 inches deep. I used an oval shaped casserole pan because I’ve used all the metal pans to water the chickens.

2. Mix all the dry ingredients into a bowl. Use your favorite method to mix in the liquids. I like to make a well in the center and add the liquids before stirring & transferring to the baking pan, but the original recipe has an interesting method for mixing right in the pan.

3. Bake the cake for 25 or 30 minutes. It’s done when a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.

4. Make the frosting by melting the chocolate chips with the coffee on the stove or in the microwave. I had twice as much frosting as I needed with this recipe, but you might like a thicker frosting layer. Try very hard not to dip a fork in the frosting to taste it. I ate about an eighth of a cup this way.

5. Let the cake cool a bit, frost and serve.

Yum!

Yum!

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©Hungry Chicken Homestead 2015

Join Chickens on the Mailing List to learn about Colorado Springs locally-owned businesses, keep up with local homestead & garden events and read stories about the hilarious homestead chickens!

Minestrone Soup in the Crock Pot

I went to the grocery store this morning to buy dry kidney beans for a batch of minestrone soup.

They don’t carry dry kidney beans.  Can you believe it?

We complain like crazy about the price of food, but it seems to me the real culprit is that nobody cooks anymore.  I set out to make a pot of soup for the same price as the $3, single serving can of minestrone soup I bought one night when I was in a hurry.  Let’s see what happened.

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Ingredients:

1 cup dry kidney beans ($.25)
1 cup orzo ($.33)
5 carrots ($2)
1 onion ($.60)
2 potatoes ($.60)
1 big clove of garlic (free from my garden)
1 quart of canned tomatoes (Home canned, $.50)
1 bay leaf (free from my garden)
1 teaspoon basil ($.10)
1 teaspoon oregano ($.10)
1 tablespoon olive oil ($.36)
1 teaspoon salt (already in my kitchen)

1. Rinse & soak the dried kidney beans overnight. You may have to go to a specialty store, like Mountain Mama Natural Foods​ here in Colorado Springs, to get them.

2. Optional: Drain the beans and sprout them for two days. This step is optional, but makes them easier to digest. Just rinse them out twice a day and leave them to digest themselves a little.  They are done when you see little tails on some of the beans.

3.  Put the beans, tomatoes, diced carrots, diced onion, diced potato and diced garlic in the crockpot with the bay leaf and a teaspoon of salt. Add about a quart of water.  Cook this on high for 8 hours or until the beans are soft. (Note: If you want really soft beans and live at altitude, try pressure cooking them first).

4.  Add the orzo, olive oil, basil and oregano when you get home. Remove the bay leaf. Cook for another 30 minutes.

5.  Serve.  The recipe makes about five hearty servings.

The total cost of the entire pot?  $3.04.  Now, granted, I spent a little less because I had some of the ingredients around and this doesn’t take into account the cost of my labor, gardening supplies or energy to can; but even if you bought a can of tomatoes and some garlic, it’s still a lot cheaper than $15 to feed five people ($30 if they’re really hungry!).

By the way, I made this recipe by finding the ingredients listed on the back of the soup can.  It also listed peas and celery, but some members of the Homestead household have allergies (and some don’t like celery).

The moral of the story is this: A little time, a little know-how and the ingredients on the back of the can go a long way…

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©Hungry Chicken Homestead 2015

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Colorado Springs Local Farm: Zen Dairy Goats Soaps & Lotions

Remember our long nap?  Well, back in September, before we fell asleep, we had the pleasure of visiting Zen Dairy Goats in Pueblo.

No doubt, this calming ranch is what caused us to fall asleep in the first place.

No doubt, this calming ranch is what caused us to fall asleep in the first place.

Zen Dairy Goats is the pet (no pun intended) project of Eric Rovegno and family.  Eric has worked with food all his life in farming and as a chef.  Today, he and his family raise a menagerie of animals.

Colorado Springs Local Business Zen Dairy Goats Turkeys

Turkeys, for example. I personally think turkeys are the weirdest animals I’ve ever seen, what with their blue heads and beak flaps, but Eric said nothing about my suspicion that he gets them from Mars.

The ranch also raises pigs and chickens.  True to form, if you look at the pictures you can find a chicken in each one.

Colorado Springs Local Farm Zen Dairy Goats 1

A tautology of goat ranching is that you must find something to do with all the milk and a family can only consume so much.  Eric makes soaps and lotions with his and you can buy one of many varieties on their website, etsy or at some farmers markets.

Colorado Springs Local Business Zen Goat Dairy Soap

You may be surprised, but the chickens are not my very favorite thing about Zen Dairy Goats, although they are high on the list.  My favorite thing is Eric’s passion for helping people.

“The biggest enjoyment I get out of it is helping people,” he says, and having seen his altruistic Facebook posts, I believe him.  “That’s why I call it Zen, because I want to make sure people are feeling calm and good.”

The products also contain Doterra oils and I know from experience they smell really good.

The products also contain Doterra oils and I know from experience they smell really good.

Zen also carries handmade lip balms and perfumes.  You can get soap/lotion sets with a perfume too.

Colorado Springs Local Farm Zen Dairy Goats perfumes

I got to try a couple of soaps that Eric gave me, the Euphoria and Geranium Rose scents.  They are nice, hard soaps that hold up well in a soap dish.  Eric says his favorite scent is the Euphoria and it is a manly sort of scent.  Personally, I prefer the Geranium Rose.  I always hope Rose is coming back into style.  It just smells so good and so does the soap!

Colorado Springs Local Farm Zen Goat Dairy Geranium Rose

You can place custom orders with Eric and, if you’re lucky like me, you’ll even get an invitation to the ranch.  Don’t miss it!  And be careful.  The place & the scents are pretty calming and you might just fall asleep when you get home!

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©Hungry Chicken Homestead 2015

Join Chickens on the Mailing List to learn about Colorado Springs locally-owned businesses, keep up with local homestead & garden events and read stories about the hilarious homestead chickens!

Where have those chickens been?

We were taking a nap and when we woke up, two months were gone!

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At least that’s what it seems like now.  Actually, we were quite busy.

Mostly, we’ve been welcoming strangers into our midst.

Glory the Tripod Cat came to live with us.  She lost a leg in a dog attack, but is thriving here.

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Glory enjoys scampering around the house on her three legs and being brushed.  It’s quite inspiring to watch her.  From the day she got here … well, really from the day she stopped needing pain medication … she has behaved as if she never had more legs than she does now.  She uses the litter box, eats her food, stares imploringly at the residents of the house when she wants to be petted and climbs around on the furniture, just like any other 14 year old.

We also acquired Luna the Lunatic.

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Luna enjoys careening around the house, hiding under the bed and eating everything she can find.  She is a short-legged, round little cat who never, ever worries that being shaped like a pillow means she isn’t pretty enough to play with Patience.

Additionally, we welcomed some very pretty, but not very sociable, chickens.

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What’s next?  Well, we’ve got some canning classes coming up, including a pressure canning class & a water bath canning class where we will make low sugar jam.  We’ve also been using our Candles with a Mission candle and are preparing a post about this remarkable Colorado Springs company.

Stay tuned.  But please, don’t bring us anymore strangers.  We’re running out of room.

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©Hungry Chicken Homestead 2015

Join Chickens on the Mailing List to learn about Colorado Springs locally-owned businesses, keep up with local homestead & garden events and read stories about the hilarious homestead chickens!

Water Bath Canning Workshop at Mountain Goat Lodge

Look at all that produce at the farmers market!  Don’t you wish you could save it? You can even buy it in bulk right now and save all kinds of money.

Colorado Springs Local Farm Austin Pears
For example, pears from a popular national grocery chain are $1.49/lb right now and we don’t even know where they came from or how long they’ve been on the shelf.  However, if you’re a member of Hunt or Gather‘s Buying Club, you could buy 25 lbs. of pears directly from the farmer for 80¢/lb. right now and can them for winter.  That’s a savings of 69¢ a pound or $17!

Well …. guess who has been invited to help facilitate such delicious savings by teaching a Water Bath Canning Workshop at the Mountain Goat Lodge on September 26?

No ... this isn't really me, but Raven is much more photogenic than I am.

No … this isn’t really me, but Raven is much more photogenic than I am.

Wanna go?  It will be a weekend of canning local produce, visiting with goats & chickens and relaxing at a B&B that doubles as a homestead. I’ll teach a two part water bath canning workshop on Saturday and Gina, the owner of the Lodge may even teach a class about goats or chickens on Sunday! You get a 10% discount on rooms that weekend if you sign up for my workshop, which makes it all the more enticing.

The schedule for the day will keep you occupied, but we’ll still have time to visit with the Lodge’s goats…

10am – noon: We’ll have some classroom and demonstration time. You’ll learn why canning works, its history and why it didn’t become popular until nearly 100 years after it was invented. We’ll cover how to prepare your jars and water bath, how to tell whether the jars have sealed and why you won’t get botulism.

Noon: Lunch on your own in Salida & maybe a nap or visit with the goats.

2PM – 5PM: We’ll can a complete recipe together, made from seasonal Colorado produce. It might be cherry amaretto jam, zucchini pickles, tomatoes or something else, depending on what the farmers are harvesting.

The workshop costs $65 per person and includes all instruction, handouts, recipes, supplies, ingredients and canned food to take home.  I know it sounds like a lot, but it will save you the tedium & confusion of canning alone and when you consider that a single 20 lb. box of organic tomatoes is around $55 (and possibly more than you need), you can see the value.

Spaces are limited, so sign up now! And then call the Mountain Goat Lodge at 719-539-7173 to book a room!

September Classes

Make Jam with KTs Creations
$30.00/person
When: Sunday September 20 from 2pm - 4pm
Where: Seeds Community Cafe
Who: Expert Jam-maker Katie Cezo and you
Learn to make low-sugar jam with Katie Cezo of KT's Creations! You'll make a jar of jam from seasonal fruit and take it home to eat.
Water Bath Canning Workshop at Mountain Goat Lodge
$65/person
Spend a Saturday learning to can at the Mountain Goat Lodge! We'll learn basic canning techniques in the morning (including how and why canning works, why you won't get botulism, how to prepare the jars, processing at high altitude and ensuring the jars sealed) and make a recipe in the afternoon. You'll have plenty of time for lunch in Salida and if you stay at the Lodge, a wonderful farm-fresh breakfast is included!
September 26, 2015 10AM - 5PM
Mountain Goat Lodge, 9582 Hwy 285, Salida, CO 81201
 

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©Hungry Chicken Homestead 2015

Join Chickens on the Mailing List to learn about Colorado Springs locally-owned businesses, keep up with local homestead & garden events and read stories about the hilarious homestead chickens!

Colorado Springs Local Business: Clean N Jerky

Mischelle Marro of Clean n Jerky tells me she likes to talk and I believe it!  She was one of the first people to start a conversation with me at our gym, Progressive Fitness Crossfit when I first joined.

Colorado Springs Local Business Clean n Jerky 1Mischelle has done CrossFit since 2010, which is an important part of the story because she got in the best shape of her life.

And then, like so many people, she went a round with cancer.

“I flew through the radiation & chemo treatments,” she said.  She credits CrossFit and the Paleo diet for her quick recovery.

Colorado Springs Local Business Clean n Jerky 5Mischelle had worked in the restaurant industry for years when a CrossFit trainer inspired her idea to make Paleo friendly jerky.  Followers of the Paleo diet look for grass-finished beef and don’t eat sugar, but jerky found in the average grocery store often omits information about the source of its beef and a lot of them contain sugar.  Mischelle already had a relationship with the Maytag family of Maytag Ranch in Hillside, Colorado, a ranch that raises small herds of beef on pasture.  In fact, she had grown up on a ranch herself, so she knew her beef!

Colorado Springs Local Business Clean n Jerky 4Once she had settled the question of where to get high quality beef, Mischelle worked out a recipe with only a handful of ingredients.  Her products contain Colorado honey instead of white sugar for sweetness.  She also uses coconut aminos instead of the more common, but Paleo unfriendly, soy and worcestershire sauce.

“I like to eat and I like to eat clean,” she says.  “Cleanliness is the appeal.  The fewer items in the product, the more appealing it should be.”

Colorado Springs Local Business Clean n Jerky 2The name, Clean n Jerky, comes from an Olympic lift called the “Clean and Jerk”, used in CrossFit.  The name fits.  The product is “clean”, a term that means close to its natural origins and it’s jerky.

Mischelle has big dreams for Clean n Jerky.  She wants to see it sold in every CrossFit gym in the country.

“I want smokestacks … with jerky smoke,” she says, smiling.

For now, you can buy Clean n Jerky locally at the Colorado Farm and Art Market or at Mountain Mama Natural Foods.

“I like that doing this keeps me in the CrossFit community, which is like a family, ” Mischelle explained, “And it keeps me motivated to work out and do better.”

“CrossFit has given me life.”

 

 

Colorado Springs Local Farm: Gusty Ridge Ranch

My conversation with rancher Lisa Maggard about visiting Gusty Ridge Ranch went something like this:

Lisa:  “…You may even be able to see a brand new baby yak. Our first baby just arrived last week and we have 4 more on the way.”

Me: “A BRAND NEW BABY YAK!!! That would be AMAZING! Sorry to overwhelm you with capital letters. I’m very excited.”

Colorado Springs Local Farm Gusty Ridge Ranch 6I always get very excited whenever I have an opportunity to see an animal I haven’t seen before, especially if it is a baby.

The tour started with a flock of silly baby turkeys.  The turkeys are silly enough that they need baby chickens as part of their flock or they won’t figure out how to eat or drink.

Colorado Springs Local Farm Gusty Ridge Ranch 13

Look closely. A silly baby turkey is hiding in this greenery.

 

Then we moved on to visit the chickens and their school bus coop with Lisa’s daughter carrying a chicken who had walked half a mile to visit her.  The chicken was probably too tired to walk back.

Colorado Springs Local Farm Gusty Ridge Ranch 1I got to see how this happens when we headed back towards the house.  Another chicken followed us the whole way.

Colorado Springs Local Farm Gusty Ridge Ranch 4The ranch is 100 acres, so we piled into the truck and drove out to see the yak herd.

Colorado Springs Local Farm Gusty Ridge Ranch 5They seemed pretty calm all and all, like big hairy cattle.  Lisa and I got out of the truck and we watched them for a few minutes.

Colorado Springs Local Farm Gusty Ridge Ranch 6One cow, a friend of Lisa’s named Wildfire, got up and began ambling towards us with her calf.  Lisa seemed perfectly calm, but I got a little nervous.  After all, it’s wise to be cautious around any large animal you aren’t personally acquainted with.

Colorado Springs Local Farm Gusty Ridge Ranch 9Eventually, Wildfire stopped and her calf hid under her.  I guess the calf was a little nervous too.  Wildfire inspected us patiently and then the two of them ambled off again.  We piled back into the truck to do more visiting.

Colorado Springs Local Farm Gusty Ridge Ranch 11Our next stop was the pasture with a rescue llama and a rescue donkey.

Colorado Springs Local Farm Gusty Ridge Ranch 12As you can see, both the llama and the donkey have made friends with one of the sheep.  The ranch has a herd of rare St. Croix sheep and this young ram spends his time out in the pasture with his friends.

Colorado Springs Local Farm Gusty Ridge Ranch3The ewes and other lambs have quarters closer to the house.

Colorado Springs Local Farm Gusty Ridge Ranch 14So close to the house, in fact, that I almost got a picture of them lounging on the patio, in much the same way that my chickens lounge on my deck.

I didn’t take many notes during the interview since we spent most of our time traipsing around this big ranch, but I did learn that Gusty Ridge Ranch will soon have yak meat and lamb for sale.  They may get another school bus coop and more chickens, so keep an eye on them if you’re looking for local eggs.

Follow them on Facebook, a course I highly recommend, especially if you don’t have enough pictures of animals in your life.  In person or on social media, they will fill that gap for you.

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©Hungry Chicken Homestead 2015

Join Chickens on the Mailing List to learn about Colorado Springs locally-owned businesses, keep up with local homestead & garden events and read stories about the hilarious homestead chickens!

Colorado Springs Local Business: Pocket Pals Trail Maps

Does this chicken look lost?

Is Randi LostI think she does, even though this picture was taken in her own yard.  Any chicken with straw on her back looks lost.  If she wasn’t so flustered, she’d notice how cute & silly she looks.

She’s probably lost because she didn’t get a good map, but I know somebody who can fix that.

Colorado Springs Local Business Pocket Pals Trail Maps 1I met with Julie Raber of Pocket Pals Trail Maps recently.  Honestly, when I think of people who make maps I imagine a man in medieval garb, probably on a ship with some sort of whimsical ghost-like creature blowing on it to make it move.  Julie isn’t like that at all.

She’s actually a twenty-first century person hiking shoes.  Julie and her husband moved to Colorado Springs 15 years ago and were really excited to explore the trails around here.  They are avid hikers to this day and had even met each other in a hiking group!  They picked up some maps and started hiking.

“We would get to a four way intersection, look at the map, look at the book, and we’d say, ‘I have no idea which way to go.'”, she says of their initial forays into our local wilderness.  “It was kind of like a guessing game.”

Most of us would buy yet another map or maybe just wander around aimlessly and hope we didn’t get hopelessly lost.  Not Julie.  It just so happens that she has a master’s degree in Geographic Information Systems and can do something called Geospatial Analysis.  If anyone is qualified to make a better map, it’s her!

Colorado Springs Local Business Pocket Pals Trail Maps 4And that’s exactly what she did!

“I love maps and I love hiking,” she explained.

For five years she and her husband had collected GPS data for fun, which meant that by the time Julie decided to make hiking maps they already had enough data for her to create a “base map” of the area.  When they hike, they collect more data and put it on the maps.  Then Julie adds notes about the trail from their experience.  It will say things like “don’t go left here” because they had gone left and it didn’t work out well.

You could say that the maps are sort of like having an experienced friend along on your hike, except that the friend is made of heavy paper that fits in your pocket, is easy to refold and won’t be ruined if you run it through the washing machine.

Colorado Springs Local Business Pocket Pals Trail Maps 3You can visit Pocket Pals website to see all the available trail maps or look at a sample.  You can also visit one of the several local retailers listed on the site who carry Pocket Pals to pick up one of these locally made maps.

This makes sense to me.  Who would make a better map of the Pikes Peak region’s trails than a person who lives and works here?

Colorado Springs Local Business Pocket Pals Trail Maps 2As for our chicken friend who is lost in the backyard, I suppose she’ll have to make her own map unless she can convince Julie to make one for her.  I don’t know where she’d keep it, though.  Chickens don’t have pockets.

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©Hungry Chicken Homestead 2015

Join Chickens on the Mailing List to learn about Colorado Springs locally-owned businesses, keep up with local homestead & garden events and read stories about the hilarious homestead chickens!

Colorado Springs Local Business: Frayla Boutique

Tina Schwaner said something about her business, Frayla Boutique & Hair Salon, that no one ever said to me before, though it seems obvious now…

“This feeds my love for shopping.”

Colorado Springs Local Business Frayla 3I always think to myself that I don’t like shopping, but it’s not entirely true.  I love poking around in shops with unique handmade and local items.  And honestly, though I dress like a person who is conflicted over modern fashion’s approach to modesty, age appropriateness and the ever-impending CrossFit workout, I actually love pretty clothes.

Colorado Springs Local Business Frayla 1Tina’s boutique is a great place to look around.  Frayla is a small, friendly hair salon (Tina is the only stylist).  She recounted how clients sometimes arrived early when she used to rent a booth in another salon.  Tina, a warm and thoughtful person, wanted everyone to feel welcome and enjoyed how waiting clients would participate in the conversation with her and her current client.

But wouldn’t it be nice, she thought to herself, if they could browse through interesting treasures at the same time?

Colorado Springs Local Business Frayla 6Frayla Boutique became a reality when she rented a space on E. Cheyenne Rd, between S. Cascade and Nevada.

Colorado Springs Local Business Frayla 10The best part of the little boutique, in my opinion, is the variety of handmade, local and fair trade items.  I found glass beads made by Colorado Springs artist Michelle Hair of New Earth Beads.

Colorado Springs Local Business Frayla 9

Frayla carries Giving Keys, a project that employs people transitioning out of homelessness.  You choose a key that speaks to you and wear it until you meet someone that seems to need it more.

Colorado Springs Local Business Frayla 4Tina notes that she’s bought and given away a lot of keys.

Colorado Springs Local Business Frayla 7Frayla also carries Made with a Mission candles.  Made with a Mission recycles glass bottles into candles.  They have a partnership with the Springs Rescue Mission here in Colorado Springs.  Tina points out that if you buy a Made with a Mission candle and a Giving Key, you’ve supported three women owned businesses, employed homeless people in two states, upcycled a bottle and a key and you’ve given back to a local mission.  Not bad for one stop shopping!

Lotion Bar Cafe is also in Colorado Springs.

Lotion Bar Cafe is also in Colorado Springs.

Stop in at Frayla, even if you don’t need your hair done.  As Tina says, you’ll find Fashion with a Conscience!

Check the Facebook page before you go.  Remember, this is a one-woman shop.  You don't want to miss out if she steps out.

Check the Facebook page before you go. Remember, this is a one-woman shop. You don’t want to miss out if she steps out.

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©Hungry Chicken Homestead 2015

Join Chickens on the Mailing List to learn about Colorado Springs locally-owned businesses, keep up with local homestead & garden events and read stories about the hilarious homestead chickens!